Order OPHIDIIFORMES: Families BYTHITIDAE, DINEMATICHTHYIDAE and PARABROTULIDAE

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v. 2.0 – 12 Sept. 2017 view/download PDF

Family BYTHITIDAE Viviparous (or Livebearing) Brotulas
34 genera · 122 species  

Acarobythites Machida 2000    acaro, small, referring to its small size (up to 25.2 mm SL); Bythites, type genus of family

Acarobythites larsonae Machida 2000    in honor of Helen Larson, Curator of Fishes, Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory (Darwin, Australia), who kindly sent bythitid and ophidiid specimens to Machida for study

Anacanthobythites Anderson 2008    an-, not and acanthus, thorn or prickle, referring to lack of developed gill rakers on first branchial arch; Bythites, type genus of family

Anacanthobythites platycephalus Anderson 2008    platys, broad; cephalus, head, referring to its depressed head

Anacanthobythites tasmaniensis Anderson 2008    ensis, suffix denoting place: Tasmania, Australia, type locality

Aphyonus Günther 1878    aphya, anchovy or small, translucent fish, referring to its transparent, colorless skin; onus, presumably a latinization of onos, a name dating to Aristotle, originally referring to Phycis blennoides (Gadiformes: Gadidae) but often mistakenly applied to Merluccius merluccius (Gadiformes: Merlucciidae) and hence used several times by Günther as a suffix for a hake-like fish

Aphyonus gelatinosus Günther 1878    gelatinous or jelly-like, referring to “thin, scaleless, loose” skin, forming a “large loose bag” on upper anterior body, “which during life is probably filled and distended with mucus”

Barathronus Goode & Bean 1886    barathron, the abyss, referring to deep-sea habitat of B. bicolor; onus, presumably a latinization of onos, a name dating to Aristotle, originally referring to Phycis blennoides (Gadiformes: Gadidae) but often mistakenly applied to Merluccius merluccius (Gadiformes: Merlucciidae) and often used as a suffix for a hake-like fish

Barathronus affinis Brauer 1906     related, allusion not explained, perhaps referring to its affinity to B. diaphanus, described in the same monograph

Barathronus bicolor Goode & Bean 1886    bi-, i.e., two-colored, referring to yellowish white color with a broad vertical band of black from origin of ventral nearly to vent, and another similar and narrower band above it upon each side

Barathronus bruuni Nielsen 1969    in honor of the research vessel Anton Bruun, from which type was collected

Barathronus diaphanus Brauer 1906    transparent or translucent, presumably referring to how its blood vessels can be seen through the skin

Barathronus linsi Nielsen, Mincarone & Di Dario 2015    in honor of Jorge Eduardo Lins de Oliveira, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte, for his lifelong commitment to the understanding of the marine biodiversity of northeastern Brazil

Barathronus maculatus Shcherbachev 1976    spotted, referring to “distinctly visible” (translation) spots along median line of body

Barathronus multidens Nielsen 1984    multi-, many; dens, teeth, referring to higher number of fangs on vomer (11) and palatines (8-11 on each) compared to any congener known at the time

Barathronus pacificus Nielsen & Eagle 1974    icus, belonging to: the northeastern Pacific, where it occurs

Barathronus parfaiti (Vaillant 1888)    in honor of J. Parfait, captain of the Talisman, French research vessel from which type was collected

Barathronus unicolor Nielsen 1984    uni-, one, referring to near uniform lack of color (skin, mouth and gill cavity without pigmentation; peritoneum only very faintly black-pigmented)

Bellottia Giglioli 1883    ia, belonging to: “good friend” Cristoforo Bellotti (1823-1919), “a modest but distinguished ichthyologist” (translation) who brought specimens of B. apoda to Giglioli’s attention

Bellottia apoda Giglioli 1883    a-, without; podal, feet, referring to absence of pelvic fins

Bellottia armiger (Smith & Radcliffe 1913)    bearing arms, referring to “opercle armed with a slender spine” and “margin of preopercle armed with 5 or 6 spines”

Bellottia cryptica Nielsen, Ross & Cohen 2009    hidden, i.e., concealed within crevices in its complex habitat, provided by tubeworms or deep-sea corals

Bellottia galatheae Nielsen & Møller 2008    in honor of the Danish Galathea 3 expedition, which circumnavigated the world in 2006-2007 and caught new and rare deep-sea ophidiiform fishes from the Solomon Sea, including this one

Bellottia robusta Nielsen, Ross & Cohen 2009    robust, referring to its short, deep body

Bidenichthys Barnard 1934    named after C. L. Biden, described elsewhere as a “knowledgeable angler,” who collected one of the types of B. capensis and “to whom the South African Museum is indebted for many specimens and much information”; ichthys, fish

Bidenichthys capensis Barnard 1934    ensis, suffix denoting place: the Cape, presumably referring to type locality at Still Bay, near Cape Town, South Africa

Bidenichthys consobrinus (Hutton 1876)    cousin, allusion not explained, perhaps referring to its relationship with one or more species in Dinematichthys (Dinematichthyidae), its presumed genus at the time

Bidenichthys paxtoni (Nielsen & Cohen 1986)    in honor of John R. Paxton (Australian Museum, Sydney), for his many contributions to ichthyology, both in research and curating

Bidenichthys slartibartfasti (Paulin 1995)    named after Slartibartfast, a designer of fjords in the first and third books of Douglas Adams’ “Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy” series, alluding to its distribution in the Fiordland region of New Zealand

Brosmodorsalis Paulin & Roberts 1989    brosmo-, referring to its placement in the subfamily Brosmophycinae (now considered polyphyletic); dorsalis, referring to two dorsal-fin characters: origin well anterior to posterior margin of operculum, and anterior rays free of membrane

Brosmodorsalis persicinus Paulin & Roberts 1989    like a persica, peach, referring to body coloration in life

Brosmophyciops Schultz 1960    ops-, appearance, referring to similarity to Brosmophycis

Brosmophyciops pautzkei Schultz 1960    in honor of Schultz’ former student Clarence F. Pautzke, chief biologist in the Game Department of the State of Washington, who was at Bikini Atoll (western Pacific) in 1946 and 1947 when type was collected

Brosmophycis Gill 1861    a “union” of some of the features of the gadiform genera Brosmius (=Brosme, Lotidae) and Phycis (Gadidae)

Brosmophycis marginata (Ayres 1854)    edged or margined, referring to bright rose-red edge on fins

Bythites Reinhardt 1835    an animal of the depths, from bythos, deep, referring to occurrence of what Reinhardt would later name B. fuscus at “great depths” (name proposed without included species)

Bythites fuscus Reinhardt 1837    dusky, referring to its black-brown coloration

Bythites gerdae Nielsen & Cohen 1973    in honor of the research vessel Gerda (Mote Marine Laboratory, Miami, Florida, USA), from which type was collected

Bythites islandicus Nielsen & Cohen 1973    icus, belonging to: Ísland, referring to type locality off southeast coast of Iceland

Calamopteryx Böhlke & Cohen 1966    calamus, reed; pteryx, fin, allusion not explained, presumably referring to elongated radials of pectoral fin

Calamopteryx goslinei Böhlke & Cohen 1966    in honor of ichthyologist William A. Gosline (1915-2002), University of Michigan, for his contributions to the knowledge of ophidioid fishes

Calamopteryx jeb Cohen 1973    coined from the initials of James E. Böhlke (1930-1982), Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, “noted” ichthyologist and co-describer of the genus Calamopteryx

Calamopteryx robinsorum Cohen 1973    orum, commemorative suffix, plural: in honor of Catherine H. and C. Richard Robins, for their contributions to the taxonomy of western Atlantic species

Cataetyx Günther 1887    etymology not explained; according to Jordan & Evermann (1898), it means katai, “at the bottom,” and tyxis, find, perhaps referring to occurrence of C. messieri near the bottom or in bottom trawls

Cataetyx alleni (Byrne 1906)    in honor of Byrne’s friend, marine biologist Edward Johnson Allen (1866-1942), Director of the Marine Biological Association of the United Kingdom, under whose auspices type was collected

Cataetyx bruuni (Nielsen & Nybelin 1963)    in honor of Danish oceanographer and ichthyologist Anton Frederick Bruun (1901-1961), scientific leader of expedition that collected type in 1946

Cataetyx chthamalorhynchus Cohen 1981    chthamalos, low; rhynchos, snout, referring to its strongly depressed snout

Cataetyx hawaiiensis Gosline 1954    ensis, suffix denoting place: Island of Hawai‘i, killed by the eruption of Mauna Loa in 1950

Cataetyx laticeps Koefoed 1927    latus, wide; ceps, head, referring to its flattened head, “broader than high”

Cataetyx lepidogenys (Smith & Radcliffe 1913)    lepido, scale; genys, cheek, referring to presence of scales on cheek (as well as opercle and top of head)

Cataetyx messieri (Günther 1878)    of the Messier Strait (Patagonia, Chile), type locality

Cataetyx nielseni Balushkin & Prokofiev 2005     in honor of Jørgen G. Nielsen (b. 1932), Zoological Museum of Copenhagen, a “prominent modern ichthyologist who made a considerable contribution to the study of fish systematics, including the order Ophidiiformes” (translation)

Cataetyx platyrhynchus Machida 1984    platy, flat; rhynchus, snout, referring to its “strongly depressed” snout

Cataetyx rubrirostris Gilbert 1890    ruber, red; rostris, snout, flushed with a dark ruby red in life

Cataetyx simus Garman 1899    blunt-nosed, referring to “very broad and bluntly rounded” snout

Diplacanthopoma Günther 1887    diplo-, twofold; akantha, thorn; poma, lid or covering, referring to two spines on operculum of D. brachysoma, one pointing backwards, the other downwards

Diplacanthopoma brachysoma Günther 1887    brachys, short; soma, body, referring to elongate, compressed body

Diplacanthopoma brunneum Smith & Radcliffe 1913    brown, referring to its “Broccoli [?] brown” body color in alcohol

Diplacanthopoma japonicum (Steindachner & Döderlein 1887)    Japanese, referring to type locality, Sagami Sea, off Tokyo, Japan

Diplacanthopoma jordani Garman 1899    in honor of David Starr Jordan (1851-1931), “in token of a hearty appreciation of his work in North American Ichthyology”

Diplacanthopoma kreffti Cohen & Nielsen 200 2   in honor of friend and colleague Gerhard Krefft (1912-1993), Institute für Seefischerei (Hamburg), “who fished and studied deep sea fishes with a passion”

Diplacanthopoma nigripinnis Gilchrist & von Bonde 1924    nigri-, black; pinnis, fin, referring to fins “darker” than brownish body

Diplacanthopoma raniceps Alcock 1898    rana, frog; ceps, head, referring to its “broad frog-like head and snout”

Diplacanthopoma riversandersoni Alcock 1895    in honor of Adam Rivers Steele Anderson (1863-1924), captain and surgeon-naturalist of the Royal Indian Marine Survey steamer Investigator, from which type was collected

Ematops Schwarzhans & Nielsen 2011    emata, fish scale; ops, face or eye, referring to unique partial covering of eye by head scales, not known in any other living ophidiiform fish

Ematops randalli (Cohen & Wourms 1976)    in honor of ichthyologist John E. Randall, Bishop Museum (Honolulu), who helped collect type and sent it to the authors, along with notes on life coloration and a color transparency

Grammonus Gill 1896    etymology not explained, perhaps gramme, line, referring to interrupted lateral line of G. ater; onus, presumably a latinization of onos, a name dating to Aristotle, originally referring to Phycis blennoides (Gadiformes: Gadidae) but often mistakenly applied to Merluccius merluccius (Gadiformes: Merlucciidae) and often used as a suffix for a hake-like fish

Grammonus ater (Risso 1810)    black, referring to its ebony black (“noir d’ébène”) color on a background of purplish red

Grammonus claudei (Torre y Huerta 1930)    in honor of French engineer (and inventor of neon lighting) Georges Claude (1870-1960), who inadvertently discovered this reef-cave fish in Matanzas Bay, Cuba, when pumping cool seawater up from the depths to convert into electricity via a process called “ocean thermal energy conversion”

Grammonus diagrammus (Heller & Snodgrass 1903)    di-, two; grammus, line, referring to two lateral lines on each side, overlapping for a fourth of their lengths

Grammonus longhursti (Cohen 1964)    in honor of oceanographer Alan Reece Longhurst (b. 1925), who collected type

Grammonus minutus Nielsen & Prokofiev 2010    small, referring to short length (32-55 mm SL) at which males attain sexual maturity

Grammonus nagaredai Randall & Hughes 2008    in honor of Bronson Nagareda, who collected type and provided a series of photographs taken in his aquarium

Grammonus opisthodon Smith 1934    ophisto-, behind; odon, tooth, allusion not explained nor evident

Grammonus robustus Smith & Radcliffe 1913    stout, probably referring to its “short, deep” body

Grammonus thielei Nielsen & Cohen 2004    in honor of Austrian underwater photographer Werner Thiele (b. 1966), the first to photograph and capture this species

Grammonus waikiki (Cohen 1964)    named for Waikiki reef, Oahu Island, Hawai‘i, type locality

Grammonus yunokawai Nielsen 2007    in honor of Kyo Yunokawa, Ie-shima Diving Center (Okinawa, Japan), who photographed and caught (by hand in the back of the cave in absolute darkness) the only known specimen

Hastatobythites Machida 1997    hastato, having spears, referring to spines on frontal and mesethmoid; Bythites, type genus of family

Hastatobythites arafurensis Machida 1997    ensis, suffix denoting place: Arafura Sea, western Pacific, type locality

Hephthocara Alcock 1892    hephthos, flaccid or weak; kara, head, allusion not explained, perhaps referring to its large but smooth, scaleless head, with “wafer-like” cranial bones

Hephthocara crassiceps Smith & Radcliffe 1913    crassus, thick, fat or stout; ceps, head, referring to its “very large, broad, and deep” head

Hephthocara simum Alcock 1892    blunt-nosed, referring to its “small snub snout,” not overhanging the jaws

Lucifuga Poey 1858    lux, light; fugo, I flee, referring to subterranean (and therefore lightless) habitat of L. dentata and L. subterranea

Lucifuga dentata Poey 1858    toothed, referring to its longer teeth and the presence of palatine teeth compared to L. subterranea

Lucifuga inopinata Cohen & McCosker 1998    unexpected, referring to unexpected find of a Lucifuga in the Galapagos, and that it brought the relationships between it and related genera into question (John E. McCosker, pers. comm.)

Lucifuga lucayana Møller, Schwarzhans, Iliffe & Nielsen 2006    ana, belonging to: the Lucayan Indians, who inhabited the Bahamas for more than 2000 years, before they were eliminated by European invaders; their name is reflected in the type locality, Lucayan Caverns (Grand Bahama Island), which they used as a graveyard

Lucifuga simile Nalbant 1981    similar, referring to its intermediate features between L. dentatus and L. subterraneus

Lucifuga spelaeotes Cohen & Robins 1970    Greek for cave or cavern dweller, referring to its occurrence in anchialine caves of the Bahamas

Lucifuga subterranea Poey 1858    underground, referring to its occurrence in anchialine caves of Cuba

Lucifuga teresinarum Díaz Pérez 1988    arum, commemorative suffix, plural: in honor of Maria Teresa del Valley Portilla and Maria Teresita de la Hoz Gonzalez, both faculty at the Universidad de la Habana and colleagues of the author

Megacataetyx Prokofiev 2005    mega-, large, presumably referring to its “massive, wide” head compared to the smaller, narrower head of the closely related Cataetyx

Megacataetyx niki (Cohen 1981)    in honor of ichthyologist Nikolai Vasil’evich Parin (1932-2012), Russian Academy of Sciences, who made specimens available to Cohen and reviewed his manuscript

Melodichthys Nielsen & Cohen 1986    Melodie, fishing vessel from which type species was collected; ichthys, fish

Melodichthys hadrocephalus Nielsen & Cohen 1986    hadros, bulky; cephalus, head, referring to robust head, ~1/3 of SL

Meteoria Nielsen 1969    ia, belonging to: the German research vessel Meteor, from which type was collected

Meteoria erythrops Nielsen 1969    erythros, red; ops, eye, referring to reddish tissue surrounding the eyes

Meteoria longidorsalis Nielsen 2016    longus, long; dorsalis, dorsal, referring to longer dorsal-fin base compared to M. erythrops

Meteoria pauciradiatus (Nielsen 1997)    paucus, few; radiatus, rayed, referring to relatively few fin rays compared to Parasciadonus brevibrachium, its presumed congener at the time

Microbrotula Gosline 1953    micro-, little, presumably referring to small size of M. rubra (up to 46.2 mm SL) and M. nigra (=Grammonus waikiki, 62.5 mm SL); brotula, then placed in the family Brotulidae

Microbrotula andersoni Schwarzhans & Nielsen 2011    in honor of M. Eric Anderson, South African Institute for Aquatic Biodiversity, for his contributions to the knowledge of the genus Microbrotula

Microbrotula bentleyi Anderson 2005    in honor of Andrew Charles Bentley (Port Elizabeth, South Africa, now Collection Manager, University of Kansas Biodiversity Institute & Natural History Museum), for his enthusiasm and help in the development of a program on western Indian Ocean fishes, and for collecting type

Microbrotula geraldalleni Schwarzhans & Nielsen 2012    in honor of ichthyologist Gerald R. Allen (b. 1942), Western Australia Museum (Perth), for his “outstanding” contribution to the knowledge of fishes from the Indo-West Pacific and his many years of support of the senior author

Microbrotula greenfieldi Anderson 2007    in honor of ichthyologist David W. Greenfield, for his numerous contributions to the systematics, conservation, behavior, and ecology of fishes (he also helped collect type)

Microbrotula hamata Schwarzhans & Nielsen 2011    hook, referring to forward-curved spine at lower angle of preopercle

Microbrotula punicea Anderson 2007    pink or reddish, referring to coloration in life

Microbrotula queenslandica Anderson 2005    ica, belonging to: Queensland, Australia, where types were collected from the Great Barrier Reef

Microbrotula rubra Gosline 1953    red, referring to its translucent pinkish-red color in life

Nybelinella Nielsen 1972    ella, diminutive connoting endearment: in honor of Swedish ichthyologist Orvar Nybelin (1892-1982), who described N. erikssoni in 1957, and who “kindly placed” his specimens at Nielsen’s disposal [replacement for Nybelinia Nielsen 1969, preoccupied by Nybelinia Poche 1925 in tapeworms]

Nybelinella brevianalis Nielsen 2017    brevis, short; analis, anal, referring to its shorter anal fin compared to congeners

Nybelinella brevidorsalis Shcherbachev 1976    brevis, short; dorsalis, dorsal, referring to fewer dorsal-fin rays than N. erikssoni

Nybelinella erikssoni (Nybelin 1957)    in honor of John Eriksson, surgeon aboard the Swedish ship Albatross, from which type was collected, for “excellent assistance in the preservation of material obtained during our trawlings and who contributed in many other respects to the biological collection work”

Paraphyonus Nielsen 2015    para-, near, referring to similarity to Aphyonus

Paraphyonus bolini (Nielsen 1974)    in honor of marine biologist Rolf L. Bolin (1901-1973), Hopkins Marine Station (Pacific Grove, California, USA), who collected type

Paraphyonus brevidorsalis (Nielsen 1969)    brevis, short; dorsalis, dorsal, referring to shorter dorsal fin compared to Aphyonus gelatinosus, its presumed congener at the time

Paraphyonus iselini Nielsen 2015    in honor of the research vessel Columbus Iselin, from which a number of deep-sea aphyonids (including this one) have been caught

Paraphyonus merretti Nielsen 2015    in honor of ichthyologist Nigel R. Merrett (b. 1940), formerly Natural History Museum (London), for providing Nielsen with a “rich supply” of aphyonid fishes caught during various R/V Discovery cruises

Paraphyonus rassi (Nielsen 1975)    in honor of ichthyologist Teodor Saulovich Rass (1904-2001), who loaned Nielsen specimens from the 14th cruise of the research vessel Academik Kurchatov and other Soviet expeditions

Paraphyonus solomonensis (Nielsen & Møller 2008)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Solomon Sea, Pacific Ocean, type locality

Parasaccogaster Nielsen, Schwarzhans & Cohen 2012    para-, near, referring to similarity to Saccogaster

Parasaccogaster melanomycter (Cohen 1981)    melano-, black; mycter, nose, referring to nasal capsule lined with “sooty black pigment”

Parasaccogaster normae (Cohen & Nielsen 1972)    in honor of Peruvian ichthyologist Norma Chirichigno Fonseca (b. 1929), who independently identified this fish as undescribed and “graciously” placed her specimens at the authors’ disposal

Parasaccogaster rhamphidognatha (Cohen 1987)    rhamphidos, hook; gnathos, jaw, referring to hook-like projection on maxillary

Parasciadonus Nielsen 1984    para-, near, most closely related to Sciadonus

Parasciadonus brevibrachium Nielsen 1984    brevis, short; brachium, arm, referring to short pectoral peduncle

Petrotyx Heller & Snodgrass 1903    etymology not explained, perhaps petrosus, rocky, referring to rock-crevice habitat of P. hopkinsi; tyxis, find (see Cataetyx), or perhaps used as a shorthand for Cataetyx, which the authors said was related

Petrotyx hopkinsi Heller & Snodgrass 1903    in honor of philanthropist Timothy Hopkins (1859-1936) of Menlo Park, California, USA, who funded expedition that collected type

Petrotyx sanguineus (Meek & Hildebrand 1928)    blood red, referring to its dark-red coloration in life

Pseudonus Garman 1899    pseudo-, false, allusion not explained; onus, presumably a latinization of onos, a name dating to Aristotle, originally referring to Phycis blennoides (Gadiformes: Gadidae) but often mistakenly applied to Merluccius merluccius (Gadiformes: Merlucciidae) and often used as a suffix for a hake-like fish, or perhaps an abridgement of Mixonus (=Bathyonus), i.e., its head “like that of Mixonus [not italicized in original] in some respects, but more elongate,”, i.e., although similar to Mixonus, such an appearance is false

Pseudonus acutus Garman 1899    sharp or pointed, allusion not explained, perhaps referring to “strong” opercular spine

Pseudonus squamiceps (Lloyd 1907)    squamus, scale; ceps, head, differing from known presumed congeners in Diplacanthopoma by having scales on head “as far forward as the posterior limit of the eyes and on the opercles and sides of the head as far forward as a line dropped vertically from the posterior border of the eyes”

Saccogaster Alcock 1889    sakkos, bag; gaster, belly, referring to large, inflated abdomen of S. maculata

Saccogaster brayae Nielsen, Schwarzhans & Cohen 2012    in honor of Dianne Bray, Senior Collections Manager, Vertebrate Zoology, Museums Victoria (Australia), for her support with material for the authors’ revision of the genus

Saccogaster hawaii Cohen & Nielsen 1972    named for its distribution off Maui in the Hawaiian Islands

Saccogaster horrida Nielsen, Schwarzhans & Cohen 2012    horrifying, referring to spines and bony ridges above its eyes

Saccogaster maculata Alcock 1889    spotted, referring to minute white spots along its sides

Saccogaster nikoliviae Nielsen, Schwarzhans & Cohen 2012    in honor of two of the senior author’s grandchildren, Nikolaj and Olivia

Saccogaster parva Cohen & Nielsen 1972    small, at 58 mm SL, the smallest member of the genus known at the time

Saccogaster staigeri Cohen & Nielsen 1972    in honor of marine biologist Jon C. Staiger, who first called this species to the authors’ attention

Saccogaster tuberculata (Chan 1966)    tuberculate, referring to tube-like sensory openings on head

Sciadonus Garman 1899    sciado-, canopy or umbrella, allusion not explained, perhaps referring to entire forehead of S. pedicellaris, “filled with mucus, which possibly may be utilized in the production of light” (subsequent researchers have not found light-producing tissue); onus, presumably a latinization of onos, a name dating to Aristotle, originally referring to Phycis blennoides (Gadiformes: Gadidae) but often mistakenly applied to Merluccius merluccius (Gadiformes: Merlucciidae) and often used as a suffix for a hake-like fish

Sciadonus cryptophthalmus (Zugmayer 1911)    cryptos, concealed; ophthalmus, eye, referring to its eye, which appear as tiny black dots well below surface of head

Sciadonus galatheae (Nielsen 1969)    in honor of the Danish Galathea Expedition, during which type was collected

Sciadonus jonassoni (Nybelin 1957)    in honor of A. Jonasson, mechanic aboard the Swedish ship Albatross, from which type was collected, who had “inter alia the responsibility for the practical part of our trawlings and to whom we are indebted for a very good piece of work in this as well as other respects”

Sciadonus pedicellaris Garman 1899    referring to its “pedicellate” (stalk-shaped) pectoral fins

Stygnobrotula Böhlke 1957    stygnos, surly, morose or sullen, referring to its “surly or sour-faced appearance”; Brotula, type genus of family (placed in Brotulidae at time of description)

Stygnobrotula latebricola Böhlke 1957    latebra, a hiding place; –cola, inhabitant of, “one that dwells in lurking-places,” presumably referring to habitat where type specimen was captured, a coral head rising from white sand in 10.6 m of slightly murky water

Thermichthys Nielsen & Cohen 2005    therm, referring to type locality, hydrothermal vents along the Galapagos Rift Zone; ichthys, fish [replacement name for Gerhardia Nielsen & Cohen 2002, preoccupied in beetles]

Thermichthys hollisi (Cohen, Rosenblatt & Moser 1990)    in honor of “expert” Alvin submersible pilot Ralph Hollis, who “finally captured this elusive fish”

Timorichthys Nielsen & Schwarzhans 2011    named for Timor Sea, off coast of northwestern Australia, type locality of T. disjunctus; ichthys, fish

Timorichthys angustus Nielsen, Okamoto & Schwarzhans 2013    narrow, referring to its narrow interorbital width compared to T. disjunctus

Timorichthys disjunctus Nielsen & Schwarzhans 2011    separated or distant, referring to position of anus midway between tip of snout and origin of anal fin

Tuamotuichthys Møller, Schwarzhans & Nielsen 2004    named for Tuamotu Archipelago, South Pacific Ocean, type locality of B. bispinosus; ichthys, fish

Tuamotuichthys bispinosus Møller, Schwarzhans & Nielsen 2004    bi-, two; spinosus, spinous, referring to two opercular spines

Tuamotuichthys marshallensis Nielsen, Schwarzhans, Møller & Randall 2006    ensis, suffix denoting place: Marshall Islands, type locality

Tuamotuichthys schwarzhansi Nielsen & Møller 2008    in honor of Werner Schwarzhans (Hamburg, Germany), for his “great” contributions to ophidiiform taxonomy


Family DINEMATICHTHYIDAE
26 genera · 116 species

Alionematichthys Møller & Schwarzhans 2008    alius, other or different; nematichthys, stem of Dinematichthys, to which this genus is most similar

Alionematichthys ceylonensis Møller & Schwarzhans 2008    ensis, suffix denoting place: Ceylon, former name of Sri Lanka, type locality

Alionematichthys crassiceps Møller & Schwarzhans 2008    crassus, thick; ceps, head, referring to its characteristically large head

Alionematichthys minyomma (Sedor & Cohen 1987)    minys, small; omma, eye, referring to its small eyes, smaller than Dinematichthys iluocoeteoides and Porocephalichthys dasyrhynchus, its presumed congeners at the time

Alionematichthys phuketensis Møller & Schwarzhans 2008    ensis, suffix denoting place: Phuket, Thailand, type locality

Alionematichthys piger (Alcock 1890)    sluggish, allusion not explained, found hiding under rocks in coral-reef pools

Alionematichthys plicatosurculus Møller & Schwarzhans 2008    plicatus, folded; surculus, sucker of a grapevine tendril, referring to its folded inner pseudoclasper

Alionematichthys riukiuensis (Aoyagi 1954)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Ryukyu Islands, Japan, type locality (but widely occurs in the Indo-West Pacific)

Alionematichthys samoaensis Møller & Schwarzhans 2008    ensis, suffix denoting place: Swains Island, American Samoa, type locality

Alionematichthys shinoharai Møller & Schwarzhans 2008    in honor of Gento Shinohara, National Museum of Nature and Science (Tokyo), for his many contributions to ichthyology and his kind support of the authors’ revision of the family

Alionematichthys suluensis Møller & Schwarzhans 2008    ensis, Sulu Sea, Philippines, type locality

Alionematichthys winterbottomi Møller & Schwarzhans 2008    in honor of Richard Winterbottom, Royal Ontario Museum, for his many contributions to ichthyology and his “great support” of the authors’ revision of the family

Beaglichthys Machida 1993    named for Beagle Gulf, Shoal Bay, Northern Territory, Australia, type locality of B. macrophthalmus; ichthys, fish

Beaglichthys bleekeri Schwarzhans & Møller 2007    in memory of Dutch medical doctor and ichthyologist Pieter Bleeker (1819-1878), “outstanding ichthyologist of the Indo-west Pacific during the early years” and who collected type in 1860

Beaglichthys larsonae Schwarzhans & Møller 2007    in honor of Helen Larson, Curator of Fishes, Museum and Art Gallery of the Northern Territory (Darwin, Australia), for her many contributions to the knowledge of the fishes of the Northern Territory of Australia

Beaglichthys macrophthalmus Machida 1993    macro-, large; ophthalmus, eye, referring to its large eyes, diameter longer than snout length

Brosmolus Machida 1993    brosmo-, referring to its original placement in the bythitid subfamily Brosmophycinae (now considered polyphyletic); –olus, a noun suffix

Brosmolus longicaudus Machida 1993    longus, long; caudus, tail, referring to its long caudal fin

Brotulinella Schwarzhans, Møller & Nielsen 2005    diminutive of Brotulina, a junior synonym of Diancistrus, to which it is related

Brotulinella taiwanensis Schwarzhans, Møller & Nielsen 2005    ensis, suffix denoting place: off the coast of southern Taiwan, type locality (also occurs off northern Philippines)

Dactylosurculus Schwarzhans & Møller 2007    dactylus, finger; surculus, sucker of a grapevine tendril, referring to functional analogy with pseudoclaspers, in this case also referring to specific shape of pseudoclasper which the authors call the “middle” pseudoclasper

Dactylosurculus gomoni Schwarzhans & Møller 2007    in honor of Martin F. Gomon (b. 1945), senior curator of fishes, Museum of Victoria (Melbourne), for his many contributions to the knowledge of the fishes of Australia

Dermatopsis Ogilby 1896    dermatos, skin; opsis, eye, referring to small eyes of D. macrodon, completely covered by skin

Dermatopsis greenfieldi Møller & Schwarzhans 2006    in honor of ichthyologist David W. Greenfield, for his “great” contributions to coral-reef ichthyology

Dermatopsis hoesei Møller & Schwarzhans 2006    in honor of ichthyologist Doug Hoese, Australian Museum (Sydney), for his many “great” contributions to Australian ichthyology

Dermatopsis joergennielseni Møller & Schwarzhans 2006    in honor of Jørgen G. Nielsen (b. 1932), Zoological Museum of Copenhagen, for his many “great” contributions to the biology and systematics of Ophidiiformes

Dermatopsis macrodon Ogilby 1896    macro-, long or large; odon, tooth, allusion not explained, perhaps referring to inner series of teeth on lower jaw, “much enlarged and continued backwards along the sides in the form of a row of widely separated, curved, canine-like teeth”

Dermatopsis multiradiatus McCulloch & Waite 1918    multi-, many; radiatus, rayed, referring to more dorsal- and anal-fin rays than D. macrodon

Dermatopsoides Smith 1948    oides, having the form of: presumably referring to similarity to or affinity with Dermatopsis and/or previous placement of D. kasougae in that genus

Dermatopsoides andersoni Møller & Schwarzhans 2006    in honor of M. Eric Anderson, South African Institute for Aquatic Biodiversity, for his “great” help with the authors’ revision of the family

Dermatopsoides kasougae (Smith 1943)    of the Kasouga River, at the mouth, west of Port Alfred, South Africa, type locality

Dermatopsoides morrisonae Møller & Schwarzhans 2006    in honor of Sue M. Morrison, Fish Section, Aquatic Zoology, Western Australian Museum (Perth), for her “great” help with the authors’ revision of the family

Dermatopsoides talboti Cohen 1966    in honor of fisheries scientist Frank Talbot (b. 1930), South African Museum, who examined specimens for Cohen and was “particularly patient” with his requests and questions

Diancistrus Ogilby 1899    di-, two; ancistrus, hook, referring to pair of hooked appendages beside genital papilla of D. longifilis

Diancistrus alatus Schwarzhans, Møller & Nielsen 2005    winged, referring to unusually large, protruding, wing-like outer pseudoclaspers

Diancistrus alleni Schwarzhans, Møller & Nielsen 2005    in honor of Gerald R. Allen (b. 1942), Western Australia Museum (Perth), for his many contributions to the ichthyology of the West Pacific

Diancistrus altidorsalis Schwarzhans, Møller & Nielsen 2005    altus, high; dorsalis, dorsal (in this case, neck), referring to its “high-necked profile”

Diancistrus atollorum Schwarzhans, Møller & Nielsen 2005    named after its habitat among the Micronesian atolls

Diancistrus beateae Schwarzhans, Møller & Nielsen 2005    in honor of the first author’s wife Beate, for her “most valuable support” during the many years he was engaged in the study of this genus

Diancistrus brevirostris Schwarzhans, Møller & Nielsen 2005    brevis, short; rostris, snout, referring to its short, blunt snout

Diancistrus eremitus Schwarzhans, Møller & Nielsen 2005    Latin for hermit, referring to type locality, Hermit Island, Bismarck Archipelago, Bismarck Sea, Manus Province, Papua New Guinea

Diancistrus erythraeus (Fowler 1946)    reddish, referring to “brilliant orange red” color when fresh in alcohol, with “brilliant orange scarlet” at end of snout and “scarlet infusion” under surface of head

Diancistrus fijiensis Schwarzhans, Møller & Nielsen 2005    ensis, suffix denoting place: Fiji, type locality

Diancistrus fuscus (Fowler 1946)    dusky, dark or swarthy, referring to “uniform pale drab brown” color when fresh in alcohol

Diancistrus jackrandalli Schwarzhans, Møller & Nielsen 2005    in honor of John “Jack” E. Randall, Bishop Museum (Honolulu), for his many contributions to ichthyology

Diancistrus jeffjohnsoni Schwarzhans, Møller & Nielsen 2005    in honor of Jeff Johnson, Collection Manager, Ichthyology, Queensland Museum (Brisbane), who collected type

Diancistrus karinae Schwarzhans, Møller & Nielsen 2005    in honor of Karin Bloch, wife of third author, for her “most valuable support” during the many hours he invested in the study of this genus

Diancistrus katrineae Schwarzhans, Møller & Nielsen 2005    in honor of Katrine Worsaae, wife of second author, for her “most valuable support” during the many hours he invested in the study of this genus

Diancistrus leisi Schwarzhans, Møller & Nielsen 2005    in honor of Jeffrey M. Leis, University of Tasmania, for his many contributions to the study of fish larvae

Diancistrus longifilis Ogilby 1899    longus, long; filum, thread, presumably referring to contiguous ventral fins, “each developed as a long filament of two distally coalescent rays”

Diancistrus machidai Schwarzhans, Møller & Nielsen 2005    in honor of ichthyologist Yoshihiko Machida, for his many contributions to the study of ophidiiform fishes

Diancistrus manciporus Schwarzhans, Møller & Nielsen 2005    mancus, missing; porus, pore, referring to lack of upper preopercular pore

Diancistrus mcgroutheri Schwarzhans, Møller & Nielsen 2005    in honor of Mark McGrouther, Collection Manager, Ichthyology, Australian Museum, for his “great help” with the authors’ revision of the family

Diancistrus mennei Schwarzhans, Møller & Nielsen 2005    in honor of Tammes Menne, fish-collection manager, Natural History Museum of Denmark, for his “great help” during the authors’ revision of the family

Diancistrus niger Schwarzhans, Møller & Nielsen 2005    black, referring to its uniformly dark gray to black color when preserved (life color not known)

Diancistrus novaeguineae (Machida 1996)    of Papua New Guinea, type locality (but occurs elsewhere in the Indo-West Pacific)

Diancistrus pohnpeiensis Schwarzhans, Møller & Nielsen 2005    ensis, suffix denoting place: Pohnpei State, Federated States of Micronesia, type locality

Diancistrus robustus Schwarzhans, Møller & Nielsen 2005    robust, referring to its “massive” head

Diancistrus springeri Schwarzhans, Møller & Nielsen 2005    in honor of ichthyologist Victor G. Springer (b. 1928), U.S. National Museum, for his many contributions to the knowledge of Pacific fishes

Diancistrus tongaensis Schwarzhans, Møller & Nielsen 2005    ensis, suffix denoting place: Tonga, where most of the investigated specimens had been obtained

Diancistrus typhlops Nielsen, Schwarzhans & Hadiaty 2009    blind, an anchialine cave-dwelling species that lacks eyes

Diancistrus vietnamensis Schwarzhans, Møller & Nielsen 2005    ensis, suffix denoting place: Gulf of Tongking, Vietnam, type locality

Didymothallus Schwarzhans & Møller 2007    didymos, double or twofold; thallus, botanical term for branch, referring to two supporters of nearly equal length in single pair of pseudoclaspers

Didymothallus criniceps Schwarzhans & Møller 2007    crinis, hair; ceps, head, referring to many hair-like cirri on occiput

Didymothallus mizolepis (Günther 1867)    mizon, greater; lepis, scale, referring to its “conspicuously larger” scales than Dinematichthys iluocoeteoides and Brosmophycis marginata (Bythitidae), its presumed congeners at the time

Didymothallus nudigena Schwarzhans & Møller 2011    nudus, bare or naked; genys, cheek, referring to a few small, non-imbricate scales on upper cheeks only (in contrast with continuous imbricate scale patch on upper and lower cheeks of D. mizolepis)

Didymothallus pruvosti Schwarzhans & Møller 2007    in honor of Patrice Pruvost, Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle (Paris), for his support of the authors’ work

Dinematichthys Bleeker 1855    di-, two and nematos, thread, referring to ventral fins each reduced to a filament of two rays; ichthys, fish

Dinematichthys iluocoeteoides Bleeker 1855    oides: having the form of, referring to its presumed relationship with the zoarcid genus Iluocoetes

Dinematichthys trilobatus Møller & Schwarzhans 2008    tri-, three; lobatus, lobed, referring to inner pseudoclasper with three lobes

Dipulus Waite 1905    etymology not explained, perhaps di-, two and pulus, a variant of phallus, referring to pair of very large pseudoclaspers, which are characteristic for the genus as diagnosed by Moller & Schwarzhans (2006), corresponding to the “very large transverse labia” described by Waite (Ronald Fricke, pers. comm.)

Dipulus caecus Waite 1905    blind, referring to its lack of external eyes

Dipulus hutchinsi Møller & Schwarzhans 2006    in honor of ichthyologist J. Barry Hutchins (b. 1946), Western Australian Museum, for his “many” great contributions to Australian ichthyology

Dipulus norfolkanus Machida 1993    anus, belonging to: Norfolk Island, Australia, type locality

Eusurculus Schwarzhans & Møller 2007    eu-, good or real; surculus, sucker of a grapevine tendril, referring to functional analogy with pseudoclaspers and specific shape of inner pseudoclasper

Eusurculus andamanensis Schwarzhans & Møller 2007    ensis, suffix denoting place: Andaman Islands, type locality

Eusurculus pistillum Schwarzhans & Møller 2007    diminutive of pistil, referring to sucker-disk shape of inner pseudoclasper, resembling the shape of a flower’s pistil

Eusurculus pristinus Schwarzhans & Møller 2007    ancient or original, referring to simpler pattern of inner pseudoclasper when compared to sucker-disk observed in both congeners

Gunterichthys Dawson 1966    in honor of marine biologist and fisheries scientist Gordon Gunter (1909-1998), Gulf Coast Research Laboratory (Ocean Springs, Mississippi, USA), which conducted larval-shrimp trawling expedition that collected G. longipenis; ichthys, fish

Gunterichthys bussingi Møller, Schwarzhans & Nielsen 2004    in honor of ichthyologist William Bussing (1933-2014), who kindly provided the authors with many specimens from Costa Rica and Isla de Coco

Gunterichthys coheni Møller, Schwarzhans & Nielsen 2004    in honor of Daniel M. Cohen, Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, whose many dinematichthyine papers have been of invaluable help to the authors

Gunterichthys longipenis Dawson 1966    longus, long; penis, copulatory organ, referring to “exceptional development of the male intromittent organ”

Lapitaichthys Schwarzhans & Møller 2007    Lapita, early indigenous pottery culture of Polynesia, discovered in New Caledonia, where genus appears to be endemic (name is based on local word xaapeta, meaning “dig a hole,” which was misheard and became lapita); ichthys, fish

Lapitaichthys frickei Schwarzhans & Møller 2007    in honor of Ronald Fricke, Curator of Fishes, Staatliches Museum für Naturkunde Stuttgart (SMNS), for his many contributions to the fishes of the southwestern West Pacific and for making SMNS material available to the authors

Majungaichthys Schwarzhans & Møller 2007    Majunga (Mahajanga) province of Madagascar, where type locality is situated; ichthys, fish

Majungaichthys agalegae Schwarzhans & Møller 2011    named for the Agaléga Islands, Mauritius, Indian Ocean, where this species was first observed (also occurs in Nosy Mitsio Archipelago off northwestern Madagascar)

Majungaichthys simplex Schwarzhans & Møller 2007    simple, referring to simple pattern of the pseudoclaspers

Mascarenichthys Schwarzhans & Møller 2007    named for the Mascarene plate, where most of the specimens observed so far have been obtained; ichthys, fish

Mascarenichthys heemstrai Schwarzhans & Møller 2007    in honor of ichthyologist Phillip C. Heemstra, South African Institute for Aquatic Biodiversity, for his many contributions to the knowledge of fishes from south and east Africa

Mascarenichthys microphthalmus Schwarzhans & Møller 2007    micro-, small; ophthalmus, referring to its small eyes (0.8-1.2% SL)

Mascarenichthys remotus Schwarzhans & Møller 2011    far away or distant, referring to remote location of this endemic species, Rodrigues Islands in the southern Indian Ocean

Monothrix Ogilby 1897    mono-, one; thrix, hair, referring to single, filiform ventral-fin ray

Monothrix polylepis Ogilby 1897    poly, many; lepis, scale, referring to smaller (and therefore more numerous) scales compared to the similar Alionematichthys piger

Nielsenichthys Schwarzhans & Møller 2011    in honor of Jørgen G. Nielsen (b. 1932), Zoological Museum of Copenhagen, for his contributions to the biology and systematics of ophidiiform fishes; ichthys, fish

Nielsenichthys pullus Schwarzhans & Møller 2011    dark, referring to dark-brown color after a short period of preservation

Ogilbia Jordan & Evermann 1898    ia, belonging to: “accomplished naturalist” James Douglas Ogilby (1853-1925), for his “excellent” work on the fishes of Australia

Ogilbia boehlkei Møller, Schwarzhans & Nielsen 2005    in honor of the late James E. Böhlke (1930-1982), Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, who collected holotype and most of the paratypes, for the “great significance of his many publications on Bahaman ichthyology which include descriptions of several bythitid taxa”

Ogilbia boydwalkeri Møller, Schwarzhans & Nielsen 2005    in honor of the late Boyd W. Walker (1917-2001), fisheries biologist, University of California, Los Angeles, who studied Ogilbia for many years

Ogilbia cayorum Evermann & Kendall 1898    orum, belonging to: a cay (also spelled key, a small, low-elevation, sandy island on the surface of a coral reef), referring to type locality, Cayo Hueso, or Bone Key, original name of Key West, Florida

Ogilbia cocoensis Møller, Schwarzhans & Nielsen 2005    ensis, suffix denoting place: Isla del Coco, Costa Rica, type locality

Ogilbia davidsmithi Møller, Schwarzhans & Nielsen 2005    in honor of ichthyologist David G. Smith, Smithsonian Institution, for his “great support” of the authors’ revision of the Dinematichthyini

Ogilbia deroyi (Poll & van Mol 1966)    in honor of A. Deroy, a resident of Santa Cruz Island, Galápagos Islands, type locality, who helped collect and/or provide type material

Ogilbia galapagosensis (Poll & Leleup 1965)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Galápagos Islands, where it appears to be endemic

Ogilbia jeffwilliamsi Møller, Schwarzhans & Nielsen 2005    in honor of ichthyologist Jeffrey T. Williams, Smithsonian Institution, who has provided many specimens from the Caribbean Sea, including a photograph of this species

Ogilbia jewettae Møller, Schwarzhans & Nielsen 2005    in honor Susan Jewett (formerly Karnella, b. 1945), Collection Manager, Division of Fishes, Smithsonian Institution, for her “great support” of the authors’ revision of the Dinematichthyini

Ogilbia mccoskeri Møller, Schwarzhans & Nielsen 2005    in honor of John E. McCosker (b.1945), California Academy of Sciences, who collected type

Ogilbia nigromarginata Møller, Schwarzhans & Nielsen 2005    nigro, black; marginata, margined, referring to black margins on vertical fins

Ogilbia nudiceps Møller, Schwarzhans & Nielsen 2005    nudus, bare or naked; ceps, head, referring to scaleless head

Ogilbia robertsoni Møller, Schwarzhans & Nielsen 2005    in honor of ichthyologist D. Ross Robertson, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Panama, who collected type specimens and deposited them at the Zoological Museum, University of Copenhagen

Ogilbia sabaji Møller, Schwarzhans & Nielsen 2005    in honor of Mark Sabaj Pérez, Collection Manager of Ichthyology, Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, who invited the authors to examine the large collection of American Dinematichthyini in Philadelphia

Ogilbia sedorae Møller, Schwarzhans & Nielsen 2005    in honor of Allegra Noelle Sedor, whose 1985 M. Sc. thesis provided much new insight to the phylogenetic implications of the male copulatory organ of dinematichthyine fishes

Ogilbia suarezae Møller, Schwarzhans & Nielsen 2005    in honor of Susan S. Suarez, Cornell University, for her “careful” 1975 study of the reproductive biology of O. cayorum

Ogilbia tyleri Møller, Schwarzhans & Nielsen 2005    in honor of ichthyologist James C. Tyler (b. 1935), Smithsonian Institution, who collected most of the type material

Ogilbia ventralis (Gill 1863)    ventral, presumably referring to its filamentous ventral fins

Ogilbichthys Møller, Schwarzhans & Nielsen 2004    Ogilbia, referring to its general resemblance to that genus; ichthys, fish

Ogilbichthys ferocis Møller, Schwarzhans & Nielsen 2004    fearsome, referring to fang-like teeth on middle dentary, which give it a “ferocious expression”

Ogilbichthys haitiensis Møller, Schwarzhans & Nielsen 2004    ensis, suffix denoting place: Haiti, type locality

Ogilbichthys kakuki Møller, Schwarzhans & Nielsen 2004    in honor of Brian Kakuk, Diving Safety Officer, Caribbean Marine Research Center, Lee Stocking Island, Bahamas, who kindly presented a newly-caught specimen

Ogilbichthys longimanus Møller, Schwarzhans & Nielsen 2004    longus, long; manus, hand, referring to long pectoral fins, longer than in any other American dinematichthyid

Ogilbichthys microphthalmus Møller, Schwarzhans & Nielsen 2004    micro-, small; ophthalmus, eye, referring to its minute eyes

Ogilbichthys puertoricoensis Møller, Schwarzhans & Nielsen 2004    ensis, suffix denoting place: Puerto Rico, type locality

Ogilbichthys tobagoensis Møller, Schwarzhans & Nielsen 2004    ensis, suffix denoting place: Tobago, type locality

Paradiancistrus Schwarzhans, Møller & Nielsen 2005    para-, near, referring to its most similar genus, Diancistrus

Paradiancistrus acutirostris Schwarzhans, Møller & Nielsen 2005    acutus, sharp; rostris, snout, referring to its sharp, pointed snout

Paradiancistrus christmasensis Schwarzhans & Møller 2011    ensis, suffix denoting place: Christmas Island, eastern Indian Ocean, type locality

Paradiancistrus cuyoensis Schwarzhans, Møller & Nielsen 2005    ensis, Cuyo Islands, northeast of Palawan, Philippines, type locality

Paradiancistrus lombokensis Schwarzhans & Møller 2007    ensis, suffix denoting place: western shore of Lombok Island, Indonesia, type locality

Porocephalichthys Møller & Schwarzhans 2008    porus, pore and cephalus, head, referring to many pores on head; ichthys, fish

Porocephalichthys dasyrhynchus (Cohen & Hutchins 1982)    dasys, hairy or shaggy; rhynchus, snout, referring to prominent cirri on snout

Pseudogilbia Møller, Schwarzhans & Nielsen 2004    pseudo-, false, i.e., although this genus may resemble Ogilbia, such an appearance is false

Pseudogilbia sanblasensis Møller, Schwarzhans & Nielsen    ensis, suffix denoting place: San Blas Archipelago, Caribbean Panama, type locality

Typhlias Hubbs 1938    derived from typhlos, blind, referring to its total lack of eyes [Typhliasina Whitley 1951 is an unneeded replacement]

Typhlias pearsei Hubbs 1938    in honor of animal ecologist Arthur Sperry Pearse (1877-1956), who collected type

Ungusurculus Schwarzhans & Møller 2007ungulus, claw; surculus, sucker of a grapevine tendril, referring to functional analogy with the pseudoclaspers and specific shape of inner pseudoclasper

Ungusurculus collettei Schwarzhans & Møller 2007    in honor of Bruce B. Collette, Director, National Marine Fisheries Service Systematics Laboratory, who collected type, for his many contributions to ichthyology

Ungusurculus komodoensis Schwarzhans & Møller 2007    ensis, suffix denoting place: Komodo Island between Flores and Sumbawa, Indonesia, type locality

Ungusurculus philippinensis Schwarzhans & Møller 2007    ensis, suffix denoting place: referring to its distribution along the Philippine Islands

Ungusurculus riauensis Schwarzhans & Møller 2007    ensis, suffix denoting place: Riau Archipelago, where most of the investigated specimens were obtained

Ungusurculus sundaensis Schwarzhans & Møller 2007    ensis, suffix denoting place: Sunda Arch of Indonesia, where all investigated specimens were obtained

Ungusurculus williamsi Schwarzhans & Møller 2007    in honor of ichthyologist Jeffrey T. Williams, U.S. National Museum of Natural History, who collected type, for his contribution to the knowledge of the fishes of the Philippines

Zephyrichthys Schwarzhans & Møller 2007    zephyrus, west wind, referring to distribution along west Australian coast; ichthys, fish

Zephyrichthys barryi Schwarzhans & Møller 2007    in honor of ichthyologist J. Barry Hutchins (b. 1946), Western Australian Museum (WAM), for many contributions to the fishes of Australia and his support in making material from the WAM collection available to the authors


Family PARABROTULIDAE False Brotulas

Leucobrotula Koefoed 1952    leukos, white, presumably referring to colorless body (with exceptions of mouth, gill membranes and peritoneum, which are blue-black); brotula, placed in Brotulidae at time of description

Leucobrotula adipata Koefoed 1952    fatty or greasy, referring to “stratum of oil globules” beneath its scaleless skin

Parabrotula Zugmayer 1911    para-, near, referring to its presumed affinity with Brotula (Ophidiidae), but without scales

Parabrotula plagiophthalma Zugmayer 1911    plagio, oblique; ophthalmus, eye, referring to its elliptical eyes, obliquely positioned on the head

Parabrotula tanseimaru Miya & Nielsen 1991    named for the research vessel Tansei Maru, University of Tokyo (which collected type), for her contributions to the biology of midwater fishes in Sagami Bay, Japan (where this species occurs)