Order CYPRINIFORMES: Family CYPRINIDAE: Subfamily CYPRININAE (f-l)

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v. 30.0 – 29 Aug. 2017  view/download PDF

Subfamily CYPRININAE (Folifer through Luciocyprinus)
Taxonomic note: includes taxa historically placed in subfamilies Barbinae and Labeoninae.

Folifer Wu 1977    etymology not explained, perhaps foli-, leaf; –ifer, to bear, referring to “middle leaf” (translation), or mentum, of lower lip, the diagnostic character of the genus

Folifer brevifilis (Peters 1881)    brevis, short; filum, thread, referring to very short barbels

Folifer hainanensis (Wu 1977)    –ensis, suffix denoting place: Hainan Island, China, where it is endemic

Folifer yunnanensis Wang, Zhuang & Gao 1982    –ensis, suffix denoting place: Yunnan Province, China, where it is endemic to Lake Fuxianhu in Jiangchuan County

Garra Hamilton 1822    local Gangetic name for a particular species of “sand-digger,” which Hamilton applied as a generic name for bottom-dwelling cyprinids “with no affinity to another genus”

Garra abhoyai Hora 1921    patronym not identified, possibly in honor of Baboos Abhoya Churn Chowdry, a scientific illustrator at the Indian Museum

Garra aethiopica (Pellegrin 1927)    Ethiopian, referring to country where it is endemic

Garra allostoma Roberts 1990    allo-, other; stoma, mouth, only member of genus (with exception of an undescribed allopatric species) with a reduced (as opposed to well-developed) mental disc

Garra alticaputus Arunachalam, Nandagopal & Mayden 2013    altus, high; caputus, head, referring to deeper head relative to other Garra from northeast India

Garra amirhosseini Esmaeili, Sayyadzadeh, Coad & Eagderi 2016    in honor of the first author’s son, Amirhossein

Garra annandalei Hora 1921    patronym not identified but clearly in honor of zoologist-anthropologist Thomas Nelson Annandale (1876-1924), Director, Indian Museum (Calcutta), where Hora worked

Garra apogon (Norman 1925)    a-, without; pogon, beard, referring to absence of barbels

Garra arunachalensis Nebeshwar & Vishwanath 2013  
ensis, suffix denoting place: Arunachal Pradesh, India, where it is distributed

Garra arupi Nebeshwar, Vishwanath & Das 2009    in honor of Arup Kumar Das, Coordinator, University Grant Commission-sponsored “Centre of Excellence in Biodiversity” (Rajiv Gandhi University, Itanagar), which supported the authors’ study of the fishes of northeastern India

Garra barreimiae barreimiae Fowler & Steinitz 1956    of Barreimi, Oman, type locality

Garra barreimiae gallagheri Krupp 1988    in honor of M. D. Gallagher, for his contributions to the knowledge of Oman fauna; he also collected type

Garra barreimiae shawkahensis Banister & Clarke 1977    ensis, suffix denoting place: Wadi (Valley) Shawkah, Oman, where it is endemic

Garra bicornuta Narayan Rao 1920    bi-, two; cornutus, horned, a possible misnomer, presumably referring to trilobed (not bilobed) proboscis on snout

Garra bimaculacauda Thoni, Gurung & Mayden 2016    bi-, two; maculata, spotted; cauda, tail, referring to black spots on caudal fin, one each on upper and lower lobes

Garra birostris Nebeshwar & Vishwanath 2013    
bi-, two; rostris, beak or bill, referring to two beak-like projections on proboscis  

Garra bispinosa Zhang 2005    bi-, two; spinosus, spiny, referring to large, unicuspid, acanthoid and forward-pointed tubercle on distal end of each lobe of snout proboscis

Garra blanfordii (Boulenger 1901)    in honor of geologist-naturalist William Thomas Blanford (1832-1905), who identified this species as G. lamta in 1870

Garra borneensis (Vaillant 1902)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Borneo, where it is endemic

Garra bourreti (Pellegrin 1928)    in honor of geologist-zoologist René Bourret (1884-1957), who collected type

Garra buettikeri Krupp 1983    in honor of medical entomologist and environmental scientist William Büttiker (Jeddah, Saudi Arabia), who collected type

Garra cambodgiensis (Tirant 1884)   ensis, suffix denoting place: Cambodia, type locality (also occurs in Laos and South Viêt Nam)

Garra ceylonensis Bleeker 1863    ensis, suffix denoting place: Ceylon (=Sri Lanka), where it is endemic

Garra chakpiensis Nebeshwar & Vishwanath 2015    –ensis, suffix denoting place: Chakpi River, Manipur, India, type locality

Garra chaudhurii Hora 1921    patronym not identified but clearly in honor of B. L. Chaudhuri, Assistant Superintendent, Indian Museum, who described many Indian fishes

Garra chebera Habteselassie, Mikschi, Ahnelt & Waidbacher 2010    referring to Chebera-Churchura National Park, Ethiopia, type locality

Garra clavirostris Roni, Sarbojit & Vishwanath 2017    clava, club; rostris, snout, referring to prominent unilobed club-shaped proboscis overhanging a depressed rostral surface

Garra compressa Kosygin & Vishwanath 1998    compressed, referring to “moderately” laterally compressed body

Garra congoensis Poll 1959    ensis, suffix denoting place: the Congo, referring to distribution in Lower Congo River

Garra cornigera Shangningam & Vishwanath 2015    cornis, horn; fero, to bear, referring to horn-like tubercles on proboscis

Garra culiciphaga (Pellegrin 1927)    culex, mosquito; phaga, to eat, referring to its proficiency (“d’excellents destructeurs”) at consuming mosquito larvae

Garra cyclostomata Mai 1978    cyclo-, circle; stomata, mouthed, presumably referring to rounded sucker (i.e., circular outline of upper lip)

Garra cyrano Kottelat 2000    referring to Cyrano de Bergerac, main character in an 1897 comedy by Edmond Rostand, characterized by his large nose, alluding to snout with a conspicuous secondary rostrum and a long and slender proboscis

Garra dampaensis Lalronunga, Lalnuntluanga & Lalramliana 2013    ensis, suffix denoting place: Dampa Tiger Reserve, Mizoram, India, type locality and only known area of distribution

Garra dembecha Getahun & Stiassny 2007    referring to Dembecha, Ethiopia, town near type locality

Garra dembeensis (Rüppell 1835)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Lake Dembea (now Lake Tana), Ethiopia, type locality

Garra dunsirei Banister 1987    in honor of Andy Dunsire, who has “encouraged so many people to search for subterranean fishes, as well as collecting such fish himself [including first specimens of this one] in isolated and hazardous regions”

Garra duobarbis Getahun & Stiassny 2007    duo, two; barba, beard, referring to single pair of barbels that are characteristic of species

Garra elegans (Günther 1868)    elegant, fine or tasteful, allusion not explained nor evident

Garra elongata Vishwanath & Kosygin 2000    elongate, referring to greater standard length in relation to body depth compared to other members of G. gotyla complex

Garra emarginata Madhusoodana Kurup & Radhakrishnan 2011    referring to its emarginated caudal fin

Garra ethelwynnae Menon 1958    matronym not identified but clearly in honor of  Ethelwynn Trewavas (1900-1993), British Museum (Natural History); Menon believed it was a “dwarf cognate form” of G. tibanica (=quadrimaculata), described by Trewavas in 1941

Garra fasciacauda Fowler 1937    fascia, band; cauda, tail, referring to narrow gray-black submarginal band on both lobes of caudal fin

Garra flavatra Kullander & Fang 2004    flavus, yellow; ater, black, referring to contrasting dark-and-light color pattern of living specimens

Garra fluviatilis Kangrang, Thoni, Mayden & Beamish 2016    of a river, referring to its habitat

Garra fuliginosa Fowler 1934    sooty, back and upper surfaces largely uniform dark or sooty brown, with obscure cloudings of gray

Garra geba Getahun & Stiassny 2007    referring to Geba River system, Tigray, Ethiopia, type locality

Garra ghorensis Krupp 1982    ensis, suffix denoting place: the Arabic al-gur (=depression), referring to distribution in the Jordan-Dead Sea rift valley system

Garra gotyla (Gray 1830)    Indian vernacular for this barb

Garra gracilis (Pellegrin & Chevey 1936)    slender or thin, referring to more elongate form compared to G. bourreti

Garra gravelyi (Annandale 1919)    in honor of biologist Frederic Henry Gravely (1885-1965), Assistant Superintendent, Zoological Survey of India, who collected type

Garra gymnothorax Berg 1949    gymnos, bare or naked; thorax, breast or chest, referring to scaleless breast (however, population from Bashar River, Iran, has hidden scales)

Garra hainanensis Chen & Zheng 1983    ensis, suffix denoting place: Hainan Island, China, type locality

Garra hindii (Boulenger 1905)    in honor of S. L. Hinde, district collector in colonial Kenya and amateur naturalist-ethnographer, who collected type

Garra hughi Silas 1955    in honor of the author’s brother, Hugh M. Silas, who collected type

Garra ignestii (Gianferrari 1925)    in honor of anthropologist Ugo Ignesti, who collected type

Garra imberba Garman 1912    im-, not; berbis, bearded, referring to lack of barbels

Garra imberbis (Vinciguerra 1890)    im-, not; berbis, bearded, referring to lack of barbels (which distinguishes it from G. lamta)

Garra incisorbis Zheng, Yang & Chen 2016    incisus, notched; orbis, circle or disc, referring to median notch on posterior edge of oral sucking disc

Garra jenkinsonianum Hora 1921    –onia and –anum, apparently both adjectival suffixes: in honor of J. Travis Jenkins, Fishery Advisor, Government of Bengal, who helped collect type, and who identified it as G. lamta in 1909

Garra jordanica Hamidan, Geiger & Freyhof 2014    –ica, belonging to: Jordan (country) and Jordan River system of Jordan and Syria, where it occurs

Garra kalakadensis Rema Devi 1993    ensis, suffix denoting place: Kalakad Wildlife Sanctuary, Tirunelveli District, Tamil Nadu, India, type locality

Garra kalpangi Nebeshwar, Kenjum Bagra & Das 2012    of the River Kalpangi, Yazali, Lower Subansiri District, Arunachal Pradesh, India, type locality

Garra kemali (Hankó 1925)   in honor of the “great Turkish statesman” (translation) His Excellency Ghazi Mustafa Kemal (also known as Mustafa Kemal Atatürk [1881-1938]), founder of modern  Turkish state

Garra kempi Hora 1921    in honor of marine biologist Stanley Wells Kemp (1882-1945), Zoological Survey of India, who “procured” type

Garra khawbungi Arunachalam, Nandagopal & Mayden 2014    of Khawbung, a village in Champai District, Mizoram, India, type locality

Garra kimini Arunachalam, Nandagopal & Mayden 2013    name of village near type locality (tributary of Ranga River, 7 km from Hola camp, Lower Subanshri District, Arunachal Pradesh, India)

Garra koladynensis Nebeshwar & Vishwanath 2017    –ensis, suffix denoting place: Koladyne River, Mizoram, India, type locality

Garra lamta (Hamilton 1822)    presumably local Gangetic name for this cyprinid

Garra lancrenonensis Blache & Miton 1960    ensis, suffix denoting place: Upper Lancrenon Falls, Ngou River, Lake Chad basin, Chad, type locality

Garra lautior Banister 1987    neater, referring to its “neat, streamlined appearance”

Garra lissorhynchus (McClelland 1842)    lissor, smooth; rhynchus, snout, referring to smooth snout without cirrhi

Garra litanensis Vishwanath 1993    ensis, suffix denoting place: Litan stream, Litan, Manipur, India, type locality

Garra longchuanensis Yu, Wang, Xiong & He 2016    –ensis, suffix denoting place: Longchuan Jiang River, Yunnan Province, China, type locality

Garra longipinnis Banister & Clarke 1977    longus, long; pinnis, fin, referring to its “conspicuously long” pectoral fins

Garra lorestanensis Mousavi-Sabet & Eagderi 2016    –ensis, suffix denoting place: Lorestan Province, southwestern Iran, where type locality, Loven Cave, is situated

Garra magnidiscus Tamang 2013    magnus, large; discus, disc, referring to very large adhesive mental disc, larger than all congeners in Southeast Asia and China except G. rotundinasus

Garra makiensis (Boulenger 1904)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Maki River, running into Lake Zwai, southern Ethiopia, type locality

Garra mamshuqa Krupp 1983    derived from Arabic word for slender, mamshuq, referring to slender shape of body

Garra manipurensis Vishwanath & Sarojnalini 1988    ensis, suffix denoting place: Manipur River, Manipur, India, type locality

Garra matensis Nebeshwar & Vishwanath 2017    –ensis, suffix denoting place: Mat River, Mizoram, India, type locality

Garra mcclellandi (Jerdon 1849)    in honor of John McClelland (1805-1875), physician and ichthyologist, who described many Indian fishes

Garra menderesensis (Küçük, Bayçelebi, Güçlü & Gülle 2015)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Büyük Menderes River drainage, Turkey, where it is known only from Lake Işıklı

Garra menoni Rema Devi & Indra 1984    in honor of ichthyologist A. G. K. Menon (1921-2002), who confirmed the identification

Garra micropulvinus Zhou, Pan & Kottelat 2005    micro-, small; pulvinus, cushion or small pillow, referring to small central pad of oral sucking disc

Garra mini Rahman, Mollah, Norén & Kullander 2016    contraction of minimus, small or short, referring to small size (up to 46.8 mm SL)

Garra minimus Arunachalam, Nandagopal & Mayden 2013    least, referring to small body size compared to other Garra reported from northeast India

Garra mirofrontis Chu & Cui 1987    mir, strange; frontis, brow, referring to “special” morphology of anterior dorsal surface of head, with a “transverse frontal groove right before eyes, forming [a] more or less pendulous frontal process with a conical tubercle at each side”

Garra mlapparaensis Madhusoodana Kurup & Radhakrishnan 2011    ensis, suffix denoting place: Mlappara, Periyar River, India, type locality

Garra mondica Sayyadzadeh, Esmaeili & Freyhof 2015     –ica, belonging to: Mond River drainage, Iran, where it is known only from two small springs

Garra montisalsi Hora 1921    etymology not explained, presumably montus, mountain, and salsus, salty or salted, i.e., of rock salt, referring to the Salt Range, a hill system in Punjab, Pakistan (type locality), named for its extensive deposits of rock salts

Garra mullya (Sykes 1839)    Marathi vernacular for this species in India, which, as Sykes explained in 1841, he adopted “so that naturalists who travel the country can always obtain” the species

Garra naganensis Hora 1921    ensis, suffix denoting place: Naga Hills, Assam, Nagaland, India, type locality

Garra nambulica Vishwanath & Joyshree 2005    ica, belonging to: Nambul River, Manipur, India, type locality

Garra namyaensis Shangningam & Vishwanath 2012    ensis, suffix denoting place: Namya River, Manipur, India, type locality

Garra nana (Heckel 1843)    nanus, dwarf, described as a “little 3-inch-long” fish (translation)

Garra nasuta (McClelland 1838)    large-nosed, referring to its snout, abruptly depressed between the eyes, with a large pit between the nostrils

Garra nethravathiensis Arunachalam & Nandagopal 2014    ensis, suffix denoting place: Nethravathi River system, Karnataka State, India, where it appears to be endemic

Garra nigricauda Arunachalam, Nandagopal & Mayden 2013    nigri-, black; cauda, tail, referring to black edges on caudal fin

Garra nigricollis Kullander & Fang 2004    niger, black; collum, neck, referring to dark stripe outlining posterior margin of head

Garra notata (Blyth 1860)    spotted or marked, referring to a series of black spots at dorsal fin base and/or one or more spots at base of anal fin

Garra nudiventris (Berg 1905)    nudus, naked; venter, abdomen, referring to scaleless breast and belly

Garra nujiangensis Chen, Zhao & Yang 2009    ensis, suffix denoting place: Nujiang River drainage, Yunnan Province, China, where it is endemic

Garra orientalis Nichols 1925    eastern, referring to distribution in the “Orient,” i.e., China

Garra ornata (Nichols & Griscom 1917)    ornate, referring to distinctive (perhaps juvenile) coloration: dusky olive above, yellowish below, minute dark spots on cheeks, opercle and sides below lateral line, broad black bars through middle of dorsal and caudal fins, black blotch at base of caudal

Garra palaruvica Arunachalam, Raja, Nandagopal & Mayden 2013     –ica, belonging to: Palaruvi Falls, Kerala, India, type locality

Garra paralissorhynchus Vishwanath & Shanta Devi 2005    para-, near, referring to similarity to G. lissorhynchus, both having a W-shaped dark band on caudal fin

Garra parastenorhynchus Thoni, Gurung & Mayden 2016    para-, near, referring to similarity to G. stenorhynchus

Garra periyarensis Gopi 2001    ensis, suffix denoting place: Periyar River, Periyar Tiger Reserve, Kerala State, India, type locality

Garra persica Berg 1914    Persian, referring to distribution in Iran (also occurs in Iraq)

Garra phillipsi Deraniyagala 1933    in honor of Mr. W. W. A. Phillips of Gammaduva (Sri Lanka), who collected type

Garra poecilura Kullander & Fang 2004    poecilio-, varicolored; oura, tail, referring to vividly patterned caudal peduncle and caudal fin

Garra poilanei Petit & Tchang 1933     in honor of Eugene Polaine (1887-1964), Paris Herbarium, who collected type

Garra prashadi Hora 1921    in honor of Baini Prashad (1894-1969), Assistant Superintendent, Zoological Survey of India, who collected type with Hora

Garra propulvinus Kullander & Fang 2004    pro-, forward; pulvinus, pillow, referring to central pad (central portion of lower lip), which appears to project forward from a broad base

Garra qiaojiensis Wu & Yao 1977    ensis, suffix denoting place: Qiaojie, Yunnan Province, China, type locality

Garra quadratirostris Nebeshwar & Vishwanath 2013    
quadrum, square-shaped; rostris, beak or bill, referring to “squarish” proboscis

Garra quadrimaculata (Rüppell 1835)    quadri-, four; maculata, spotted, a possible misnomer since Rüppell described only three spots: at scapular area, dorsal fin, and base of caudal

Garra rakhinica Kullander & Fang 2004    ica, belonging to: Rakhine State, Myanmar, type locality and only known area of occurrence

Garra regressus Getahun & Stiassny 2007    to go back, referring to regressed rostral cap characteristic of species

Garra rhynchota Koller 1926    muzzled, referring to round, peg-like protuberance between the eyes

Garra robertsi Thoni & Mayden 2015   in honor of “prominent” ichthyologist Tyson R. Roberts (b. 1940), for his “long-running focus” on Bornean and Southeast Asian fishes

Garra rossica (Nikolskii 1900)    icus, belonging to: Rossiya (latinization of Russia in the Russian language), presumably referring to type locality in Turkmenistan, which at the time was part of the Russian Empire

Garra rotundinasus Zhang 2006    rotundus, round; nasus, snout, referring to broadly rounded snout

Garra rufa (Heckel 1843)    rufus, red or reddish, referring to rusty-red head seen on some specimens

Garra rupecula (McClelland 1839)    rupes, rock; colus, dwelling in, presumably referring to occurrence in a mountain stream at 1000 feet

Garra sahilia sahilia Krupp 1983    latinization of Arabic word for coastal, sahili, referring to distribution in coastal drainages of Yemen

Garra sahilia gharbia Krupp 1983    latinization of Arabic word for western, gharbi, referring to distribution west of G. s. sahilia

Garra salweenica Hora & Mukerji 1934    ica, belonging to: Salween River at Takaw, Kengtung State, Myanmar, type locality

Garra sindhi Lyon, Geiger & Freyhof 2016    in honor of Cynthia “Sindhi” Diane Powell, for her support of the first author’s work for over a decade, including support and assistance during his research in Dhofar [a noun in apposition, without the matronymic “ae”]   

Garra smartae Krupp & Budd 2009    in honor of Emma Smart, Dubai, for her studies of Arabian wadi fish and her contributions to the conservation of freshwater habitats in Arabia; she also collected type specimens and provided detailed information about type locality [originally spelled smarti, amended to smartae to reflect correct gender]

Garra spilota Kullander & Fang 2004    spotted, referring to row of dark blotches along middle of side

Garra stenorhynchus (Jerdon 1849)    stenos, narrow; rhynchus, snout, referring to “more acute” snout compared to G. mcclellandi

Garra surendranathanii Shaji, Arun & Easa 1996    in honor of Shri. P. K. Surendranathan Asari, Chief Conservator of Forests, Kerala Forest Department, a “constant source of encouragement” for wildlife research in Kerala, India

Garra tamangi Gurumayum & Kosygin 2016    in honor of Lakpa Tamang, Zoological Survey of India, for his assistance to the authors during field work in Arunachal Pradesh

Garra tana Getahun & Stiassny 2007    referring to Lake Tana, Ethiopia, where it is endemic

Garra tashanensis Mousavi-Sabet, Vatandoust, Fatemi & Eagderi 2016    –ensis, suffix denoting place, Tashan region, Tigris River drainage, Iran, where Tashan Cave (type locality) is situated

Garra tengchongensis Zhang & Chen 2002    ensis, suffix denoting place: Tengchong County, Yunnan Province, China, type locality

Garra theunensis Kottelat 1998    ensis, suffix denoting place: lower, upper and middle Nam Theun, Laos, where it is endemic

Garra trewavasae Monod 1950    matronym not identified but clearly in honor of British ichthyologist Ethelwynn Trewavas (1900-1993)

Garra trilobata Shangningam & Vishwanath 2015    tri-, three; lobata, lobed, referring to trilobed proboscis

Garra tyao Arunachalam, Nandagopal & Mayden 2014    referring to Tyao River in Tyao village, Champhai District, Mizoram, India, type locality

Garra typhlops (Bruun & Kaiser 1944)    blind, a cave fish with “no external traces of eyes to be seen”

Garra ukhrulensis Nebeshwar & Vishwanath 2015    –ensis, suffix denoting place: Ukhrul district, Manipur, India, type locality

Garra variabilis (Heckel 1843)    variable, being “difficult to find two very similarly colored individuals” (translation)

Garra waensis Lothongkham, Arbsuwan & Musikasinthorn 2014    –ensis, suffix denoting place: Wa River basin, Nan Province, Thailand, only known area of occurrence

Garra wanae (Regan 1914)    of Wana Toi, tributary of Gomal River, southwestern Waziristan, Pakistan, type locality

Garra waterloti (Pellegrin 1935)    in honor of Georges Waterlot, who collected specimens for the Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle (Paris) in French West Africa, including type of this one

Garra widdowsoni (Trewavas 1955)    in honor of engineer A. G. Widdowson, Iraq Petroleum Company Ltd., who discovered this species and facilitated collection of type series

Garra yiliangensis Wu & Chen 1977    ensis, suffix denoting place: Yiliang, Yunnan Province, China, type locality

Gibelion Heckel 1843    etymology not explained, perhaps derived from giebel, German name for Crucian Carp, Carassius gibelio, alluding to a similarity with that species [genus often given as Catla Valenciennes 1844, but Gibelion has priority]

Gibelion catla (Hamilton 1822)    Bengali, Hindi and Punjabi vernacular for this species

Gymnocypris Günther 1868    gymnos, bare or naked, referring to nearly scaleless body; cypris, a small carp, a common suffix for cyprinid genera

Gymnocypris chilianensis Li & Chang 1974    ensis, suffix denoting place: Qilian Range, northeast ridge of Tibetan Plateau, where it is endemic (“chilian” is the approximate phonetic spelling of “Qilian”)

Gymnocypris chui chui Tchang, Yueh & Hwang 1964    patronym not identified, perhaps in honor of Y.-T. Chu, who published many papers on Chinese fishes in the 1930s

Gymnocypris chui longimandibularis Tsao, Chen, Wu & Zhu 1992    longus, long; mandibularis, lower jaw, presumably referring to longer mouth (reflected in smaller mouth width-to-length ratio) compared to G. c. chui

Gymnocypris dobula dobula Günther 1868    latinization of Döbel, German name for Squalius cephalus, which it presumably resembles

Gymnocypris dobula chuoculongensis Tsao, Chen, Wu, Tsao, Chen & Zhu 1992    ensis, suffix denoting place: Chuocuolong Lake, Tibet, type locality and presumed only area of occurrence

Gymnocypris eckloni eckloni Herzenstein 1891    in honor of F. L. Ecklon, one of Nikolai Przhevalsky’s assistants during his second trip to Tibet, whose services Przhevalsky said were “invaluable” (translation)

Gymnocypris eckloni scoliostomus Wu & Chen 1979    scolio-, curved; stomus, mouth, referring to “deeply arched” mouth cleft

Gymnocypris firmispinata Wu & Wu 1988    firmus, strong; spinatus, spined, referring to stronger third simple ray of dorsal fin compared to weaker dorsal spine of G. potanini

Gymnocypris namensis (Wu & Ren 1982)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Nam Cuo Lake, northeastern Tibet, type locality

Gymnocypris pengquensis Tang, Feng, Wanghe, Li & Zhao 2016    –ensis, suffix denoting place: Pengqu River, Nielamu and Dingri counties, Tibet, where it appears to be endemic

Gymnocypris potanini Herzenstein 1891    in honor of Grigory Nikolayaevich Potanin (1835-1920), Russian explorer of Inner Asia

Gymnocypris przewalskii (Kessler 1876)    in honor of geographer and explorer Nikolai Przhevalsky (also spelled Przewalski and Prjevalsky, 1839-1888), who collected type and in whose book about Mongolia Kessler’s description appeared

Gymnocypris scleracanthus Tsao, Wu, Chen & Zhu 1992    sclero-, tough or hard; acanthus, thorn, presumably referring to “saw-like thorn” (translation, i.e., osseus ray) on dorsal fin

Gymnocypris waddellii Regan 1905    in honor of Lieut.-Col. Laurence Austine Waddell, C.B. [Companion of the Order of the Bath] (1854-1938), British army surgeon, explorer, philologist, linguist, and chemistry and pathology professor, who preserved type specimens in salt before presenting them to the British Museum (Natural History)

Gymnodiptychus Herzenstein 1892    gymnos, bare or naked, referring to absence of scales except on lateral line; Diptychus, genus in which type species, G. dybowskii, had originally been assigned

Gymnodiptychus dybowskii dybowskii (Kessler 1874)    in honor of Benedykt Dybowski, “indefatigable researcher of the fauna of East Siberia” (translation)

Gymnodiptychus dybowskii ganzihonensis (Zhu & Wu 1975)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Ganzi River, Qinghai, China, where it appears to be endemic

Gymnodiptychus integrigymnatus Mo 1989    integer, whole; gymnatus, naked, referring to “complete” absence of scales (except for anal scales and pelvic axillary scale on body) (Xiao-Yong Chen, pers. comm.)

Gymnodiptychus pachycheilus pachycheilus Herzenstein 1892    pachys, thick; cheilus, lip, probably referring to thick and fleshy lower lip

Gymnodiptychus pachycheilus weiheensis Wang & Song 1985    ensis, suffix denoting place: Weihe River system, southeastern Gansu Province, China, type locality

Gymnostomus Heckel 1843    gymnos, bare or naked; stomus, mouth, presumably referring to absence (or seeming absence) of barbels

Gymnostomus caudiguttatus (Fowler 1934)    cauda, tail; guttatus, spotted, referring to “scattered darker gray spots” on gray tail

Gymnostomus caudimaculatus (Fowler 1934)    cauda, tail; maculatus, spotted, referring to round black spot, size of pupil, at caudal-fin base

Gymnostomus cryptopogon (Fowler 1935)    cryptos, concealed; pogon, beard, referring to concealed pair of maxillary barbels

Gymnostomus horai (Bănărescu 1986)    in honor of the late Sunder Lal Hora (1896-1955), ichthyologist and former Director of the Zoological Survey of India, who named this cyprinid in 1938 but did not describe it   

Gymnostomus inornatus (Roberts 1997)    undecorated, referring to dull white or silvery coloration, with no distinctive markings other than humeral spot

Gymnostomus lineatus (Smith 1945)    lined, referring to five narrow, sharply defined blackish longitudinal stripes on body

Gymnostomus lobatus (Smith 1945)    lobed, presumably referring to how a “deep median incision in the rostral flap divide[s] it into two lobes”

Gymnostomus ornatipinnis (Roberts 1997)    ornatus, decorated; pinnis, fins, referring to colorful fins (pectoral, pelvic and anal fins reddish-orange or at least rose-tinted; pelvic and anal fins often tipped with white)

Gymnostomus siamensis (Sauvage 1881)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Siam, or Thailand, referring to type locality in Bangkok

Haludaria Pethiyagoda 2013    ia, belonging to: Haludar, a Bengal youth (ca. 1797), the artist who illustrated Francis Hamilton’s 1822 Gangetic Fishes, a founder work in Indian ichthyology [replacement name for Dravidia Pethiyagoda, Meegaskumbura & Maduwage 2012, preoccupied in by Dravidia Lehrer 2010 in Diptera]

Haludaria fasciata fasciata (Jerdon 1849)    banded, referring to three dark vertical bands on body (of fresh specimens)

Haludaria fasciata pradhani (Tilak 1973)    in honor of K. S. Pradhan, Superintending Zoologist, Zoological Survey of India, who collected type

Haludaria kannikattiensis (Arunachalam & Johnson 2003)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Kannikatti Reserve Forest region, Tirunelveli district, Tamil Nadu, India, type locality

Hampala Kuhl & van Hasselt 1823    from local Javanese name Hampel (presumably for H. macrolepidota)

Hampala ampalong (Bleeker 1852)    from Hampalong, one of the local Malay names for species of Capoeta (in which this species was originally described)

Hampala bimaculata (Popta 1905)    bi-, two; maculata, spotted, referring to two vertical blotches on side, one under dorsal and other on anterior part of caudal peduncle

Hampala dispar Smith 1934    dissimilar, referring to how in most characters (e.g., shape, squamation, fin rays) it “agrees closely” with H. macrolepidota but differs in coloration and “certain minor morphological features”

Hampala lopezi Herre 1924    in honor of G. A. Lopez, collector for the Philippine Bureau of Science, who obtained type

Hampala macrolepidota Kuhl & van Hasselt 1823    macro-, long; lepidota, scaled, allusion not explained, possibly referring to larger scales (~28 along lateral line) compared to Leuciscus (which at the time was a catch-all cyprinid genus)

Hampala sabana Inger & Chin 1962    ana, belonging to: Sabah, earlier name for North Borneo, where it is endemic

Hampala salweenensis Doi & Taki 1994    ensis, suffix denoting place: Salween River basin, northwest Thailand, the only species of genus known to occur there

Herzensteinia Chu 1935    -ia, belonging to: Russian ichthyologist Solomon Markovich Herzenstein (1854-1894), who described type species in 1891

Herzensteinia microcephalus (Herzenstein 1891)    micro-, small; cephalus, head, referring to smaller head compared to Schizopygopsis guentheri (=S. pylzovi), presumed closest relative at time of description

Hongshuia Zhang, Qiang & Lan 2008    ia, belonging to: Hongshui He, Fengshan County, Guangxi Province, China, where type species (H. paoli) was collected

Hongshuia banmo Zhang, Qiang & Lan 2008    referring to Ban Mo village, Tian’e County, Guangxi Province, China, type locality

Hongshuia microstomatus (Wang & Chen 1989)    micro-, small; stomatus, mouthed, referring to smaller mouth compared to Sinocrossocheilus guizhouensis, its presumed congener at the time

Hongshuia paoli Zhang, Qiang & Lan 2008    of Pao Li, Chinese name of type locality in Pearl River drainage, Fengshan County, Guangxi Province, China

Horalabiosa Silas 1954    Hora, in honor of ichthyologist Sunder Lal Hora (1896-1955), “in token of his extensive work on the freshwater fishes of India”; labiosa, large-lipped, probably referring to post-labial callous pad of H. joshuai

Horalabiosa arunachalami Johnson & Soranam 2001    in honor of M. Arunachalam, Manonmaniam Sundaranar University, “in appreciation of his interest in various aspects of stream fishes”

Horalabiosa joshuai Silas 1954    in honor of Silas’ former professor, J. P. Joshua, Madras Christian College, during whose entomological survey Silas was able to take a small collection of fishes, including type of this one

Horalabiosa palaniensis Rema Devi & Menon 1994    ensis, suffix denoting place: Palani Hills, western Ghats, southern India, type locality

Hypselobarbus Bleeker 1860    hypselos, high or tall, i.e., a “tall” Barbus or barb, referring to steep, angled back of H. mussullah

Hypselobarbus basavarajai Arunachalam, Chinnaraja & Mayden 2016    in honor of fisheries scientist N. Basavaraja, who criticized the identity of H. pulchellus as proposed in earlier studies, which led to the idea of searching collections of fishes from the Karnataka type locality, which then resulted in the discovery of this species

Hypselobarbus bicolor Knight, Rai, D’Souza, Philip & Dahanukar 2016    two-colored, referring to its predominantly black and silver coloration

Hypselobarbus canarensis (Jerdon 1849)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Canara, southern India, original type locality (redescribed in 2013 with neotype locality, Daksshin Kanada, India)

Hypselobarbus carnaticus (Jerdon 1849)    icus, belonging to: the Carnatic coast, referring to distribution in South India

Hypselobarbus curmuca (Hamilton 1807)    derived from Karmuka, presumably local vernacular (Telugu?) for this species [spelled carmuca in text and curmuca on plate]

Hypselobarbus dobsoni (Day 1876)    in honor of Dr. A. F. Dobson, Madras Medical Service, who provided Day with ~170 fishes from Deccan, India

Hypselobarbus dubius (Day 1867)    uncertain, referring to similarity to Puntius (Barbodes) gracilis (=H. micropogon), which Day conjectured were sexually dimorphic conspecifics

Hypselobarbus gracilis (Jerdon 1849)    thin or slender, allusion not explained and a curious name for a deep-bodied species, perhaps referring to shorter body depth compared to presumed congeners mentioned in same publication

Hypselobarbus jerdoni (Day 1870)    patronym not identified but clearly in honor of physician-naturalist Thomas Caverhill Jerdon (1811-1872), who described many fishes from India, including H. gracilis

Hypselobarbus kolus (Sykes 1839)    latinization of kolis and/or Kolashi, Marathi vernacular for this species in India, which, as Sykes explained in 1841, he adopted “so that naturalists who travel the country can always obtain” the species

Hypselobarbus kurali Menon & Rema Devi 1995    derived from Kural, local name for this fish in Kerala, South India (K. Rema Devi, pers. comm.)

Hypselobarbus kushavali Arunachalam, Chinnaraja, Sivakumar & Mayden 2016    named for the village Kushavali (Western Ghats, peninsular India), where the Kali River (only known location) originates

Hypselobarbus lithopidos (Day 1874)    lithos, stone; eidos, form, probably referring to “slaty” coloration

Hypselobarbus maciveri (Annandale 1919)    in honor of “Mr. McIver,” probably Charles Donald McIver (1881-1946), who collected specimens for the Indian Museum, including type of this species (note latinization of “Mc” to “Mac”)

Hypselobarbus menoni Arunachalam, Chinnaraja, Chandran & Mayden 2014    in honor of the “eminent” Indian ichthyologist A. G .K. Menon (1921-2002), who helped collect type in 1990 and resurrected the genus Hypselobarbus in 1995

Hypselobarbus micropogon (Valenciennes 1842)    micro-, small; pogon, beard, “remarkable for the smallness of its four barbels” (translation)

Hypselobarbus mussullah (Sykes 1839)    Marathi vernacular for this species in India, which, as Sykes explained in 1841, he adopted “so that naturalists who travel the country can always obtain” the species

Hypselobarbus nasutus Arunachalam, Chinnaraja & Mayden 2016    long-nosed, referring to its long snout   

Hypselobarbus nilgiriensis Arunachalam, Chinnaraja & Mayden 2016    ensis, suffix denoting place: Nilgiri Biosphere Reserve (Tamil Nadu, India), which encompasses the only two rivers (Bhavani and Noolpuzha) where it is known to occur

Hypselobarbus periyarensis (Raj 1941)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Periyar Lake, Travancore, India, only known area of occurrence

Hypselobarbus pulchellus (Day 1870)    diminutive of pulcher, beautiful, allusion not explained, perhaps referring to silver- or bronze-colored band running across length of body two scales high (clearly perceivable in the dry skin mount from which Day described this species)

Hypselobarbus tamiraparaniei Arunachalam, Chinnaraja, Chandran & Mayden 2014
of the Tamiraparani River, south Tamil Nadu, India, type locality

Hypselobarbus thomassi (Day 1874)    in honor of angler Henry Sullivan Thomas, Madras Civil Service, who first brought the fish to Day’s notice [note misspelling, with an extra s]

Hypselobarbus vaigaiensis Arunachalam, Chinnaraja, Chandran & Mayden 2014    –ensis, suffix denoting place: Mulavaigai (origin of Vaigai), inside Periyar Tiger Reserve, Kerala, India, type locality

Hypsibarbus Rainboth 1996    hypselos, high or tall, i.e., a “tall” Barbus or barb, presumably referring to steep, angled back of all species

Hypsibarbus annamensis (Pellegrin & Chevey 1936)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Annam, a French protectorate encompassing central region of present-day Viêt Nam, type locality

Hypsibarbus lagleri Rainboth 1996    in honor of Karl F. Lagler (1912-1985), who directed and organized the Mekong Basinwide Fishery Studies, during which many of the specimens used in Rainboth’s study of the genus were collected

Hypsibarbus macrosquamatus (Mai 1978)    macro-, large; squamatus, scaled, presumably referring to large number of lateral line scales (30-33)

Hypsibarbus malcolmi (Smith 1945)    in honor of Malcolm Smith (1875-1958), British Museum (Natural History), for his efforts to promote knowledge of Thai zoology, especially of fishes and reptiles

Hypsibarbus myitkyinae (Prashad & Mukerji 1929)    of Myitkyina District, Upper Myanmar, type locality

Hypsibarbus birtwistlei (Herre 1940)    in honor of William Birtwistle, Director, Fisheries Department, Singapore, who “greatly” aided Herre’s study of Malayan fishes

Hypsibarbus huguenini (Bleeker 1853)    in honor of its discoverer, O. F. W. J. Huguenin, mining engineer

Hypsibarbus oatesii (Boulenger 1893)    in honor of civil servant (in India and Burma) and amateur ornithologist Eugene William Oates (1845-1911), who collected type

Hypsibarbus pierrei (Sauvage 1880)    in honor of “Pierre” (no other information given), who collected type; possibly botanist Jean Baptiste Louis Pierre (1833-1905), first director of Saigon Botanic Garden, who made many collections in tropical Asia

Hypsibarbus salweenensis Rainboth 1996    ensis, suffix denoting place: Salween River, Maehongsorn, Thailand, type locality

Hypsibarbus suvattii Rainboth 1996    in honor of Chote Suvatti, “well-known” natural historian and former dean of the Faculty of Fisheries, Kasetart University, Bangkok

Hypsibarbus vernayi (Norman 1925)    in honor of Arthur S. Vernay (1877-1960), big game hunter, explorer, and American Museum of Natural History trustee, who helped collect type

Hypsibarbus wetmorei (Smith 1931)    in honor of ornithologist Alexander Wetmore (1886-1978), assistant secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, in charge of the United States National Museum

Incisilabeo Fowler 1937    incisum, notch, proposed as a subgenus of Labeo distinguished by a transverse groove on snout separating a distinct arrangement of pearl organs

Incisilabeo behri (Fowler 1937)    in honor of the late Otto Behr, of Lopez, Pennsylvania (USA), to whom the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia was indebted for many specimens of the natural history of Thailand

Kalimantania Bănărescu 1980    ia, belonging to: Kalimantan (previously Borneo), referring to island where genus is endemic

Kalimantania lawak (Bleeker 1855)    derived from Ikan Lawak (also Ikan Lulawak), local Malay name for this species (ikan=fish)

Labeo Cuvier 1816    labeo, one with large lips, referring to “remarkably thick, fleshy lips” (translation) of L. fimbriatus and L. niloticus (=vulgaris)

Labeo alluaudi Pellegrin 1933    in honor of entomologist and explorer Charles A. Alluaud (1861-1949), who led expedition that collected type

Labeo alticentralis Tshibwabwa 1997    altus, upper; centralis, central, referring to type locality in upper Lualaba River in the central Congo River basin

Labeo altivelis Peters 1852    altus, high; velum, sail, referring to large dorsal fin with extended rays

Labeo angra (Hamilton 1822)    presumably a local Bengali name, as it was Hamilton’s practice to derive trivial names “from some of those used by the natives of India”

Labeo annectens Boulenger 1903    linking or joining, “completely connecting Labeo with Tylognathus, and showing that the latter genus can no longer be distinguished” [Tylognathus is now a synonym of Bangana]

Labeo ansorgii Boulenger 1907    in honor of explorer William John Ansorge (1850-1913), who collected type

Labeo barbatulus (Sauvage 1878)    with a small beard, presumably referring to fringed barbels on upper and lower lips (although barbels appear to be shorter than two congenerics described in same paper, Rohita sima and R. pectoralis, both now synonyms of L. chrysophekadion)

Labeo barbatus Boulenger 1898    bearded, referring to two pairs of well-developed barbels, much longer than eye in adults

Labeo bata (Hamilton 1822)    presumably a local Bengali name, as it was Hamilton’s practice to derive trivial names “from some of those used by the natives of India”

Labeo batesii Boulenger 1911    in honor of George Latimer Bates (1863-1940), Cameroon farmer and ornithologist, who collected specimens for the Natural History Museum (London), including type of this species

Labeo boga (Hamilton 1822)    presumably a local Bengali name, as it was Hamilton’s practice to derive trivial names “from some of those used by the natives of India”

Labeo boggut (Sykes 1839)    Marathi vernacular for this species in India, which, as Sykes explained in 1841, he adopted “so that naturalists who travel the country can always obtain” the species

Labeo bottegi Vinciguerra 1897    in honor of Italian Army officer Vittorio Bottego (1860-1897), who led expedition to Somalia (1895-1897), during which type was collected [Vincinguerra dropped the terminal “o” in Bottego’s name to adhere to a strict interpretation of the Latin genitive; he later regretted retaining the “o” in his 1895 description of Neobola bottegoi (Danioninae) and wished to amend the spelling]

Labeo boulengeri Vinciguerra 1912    patronym not identified but clearly in honor of ichthyologist-herpetologist George A. Boulenger (1858-1937), whose works on African fishes are frequently cited by Vinciguerra

Labeo brachypoma Günther 1868    brachy, short; poma, lid or covering, referring to “very short” gill cover

Labeo caeruleus Day 1877    sky-blue, referring to “bluish” body coloration

Labeo calbasu (Hamilton 1822)    derived from Kalbosu, local Bengali name for this species

Labeo camerunensis Trewavas 1974    ensis, suffix denoting place: Cameroon, type locality

Labeo capensis (Smith 1841)    ensis, suffix denoting place: the Cape Colony, referring to type locality in what is now South Africa

Labeo chariensis Pellegrin 1904    ensis, suffix denoting place: Chari River, Chad, type locality

Labeo chrysophekadion (Bleeker 1849)    chrysos, gold; phekadion, lens-shaped spots, referring to golden spot on each scale on adults

Labeo congoro Peters 1852    congôro, indigenous name for this species in Mozambique

Labeo coubie Rüppell 1832    local name among the native fishermen of Cairo, Egypt

Labeo curchius (Hamilton 1822)    latinization of Kurchi, local Bengali name for this species

Labeo curriei Fowler 1919    in honor of entomologist Rolla P. Currie (1875-1960), who obtained the types

Labeo cyclopinnis Nichols & Griscom 1917    cyclo-, circular; pinnis, fin, probably referring to concave upper edge of dorsal fin and/or crescentic shape of caudal fin

Labeo cyclorhynchus Boulenger 1899    cyclo-, circular; rhynchus, snout, referring to large and rounded snout (“le museau est gros et arrondi”)

Labeo cylindricus Peters 1852    referring to elongate cylindrical body (“corpore cylindrico elongato”)

Labeo degeni Boulenger 1920    in honor of collector and ornithologist Edward Degen, who helped collect type and supplied a watercolor painting from which Boulenger described life coloration

Labeo dhonti Boulenger 1920    in honor of Dhont-De Bie, Belgian East African Expeditionary Force, who collected type

Labeo djourae Blache & Miton 1960    name not explained, perhaps referring to Djour (or Djoura), an area in Chad presumably at or near type locality

Labeo dussumieri (Valenciennes 1842)    in honor of Jean-Jacques Dussumier (1792-1883), French voyager and merchant, whose account of this species is the basis of Valenciennes’ description

Labeo dyocheilus dyocheilus (McClelland 1839)    dyo, two or double; cheilus, lip, referring to “pendulous structure of the snout descending so as to form the appearance of a second lip”

Labeo dyocheilus pakistanicus Mirza & Awan 1976    Pakistani, referring to type locality (also occurs in India)

Labeo erythropterus Valenciennes 1842    erythros, red; pterus, fin, referring to red edging on anal and caudal fins

Labeo falcipinnis Boulenger 1903    falcatus, sickle-shaped; pinnis, fin, referring to falcate dorsal fin

Labeo filiferus Plamoottil & Zupancic 2017    filum, thread; fero, to bear, referring to filamentous dorsal-fin ray, which reaches above caudal-fin base

Labeo fimbriatus (Bloch 1795)    fringed, referring to its thick, fringed lips

Labeo fisheri Jordan & Starks 1917    in honor of zoologist Walter Kenrick Fisher (1878-1953), who collected type with a cast net

Labeo forskalii Rüppell 1835    in honor of Swedish explorer and naturalist Peter Forsskål, also known as Petrus Forskål (1732-1763), who had identified this species as a variety of Cyprinus niloticus (=Labeo vulgaris) in a posthumous publication in 1775

Labeo fuelleborni Hilgendorf & Pappenheim 1903    in honor of Friedrich Fülleborn (1866-1933), who collected type during his travels as a parasitologist and military physician

Labeo fulakariensis Tshibwabwa, Stiassny & Schelly 2006    ensis, suffix denoting place: Foulakari River, Republic of Congo, near where most of the type series was collected

Labeo gonius (Hamilton 1822)    latinization of Goni, local Bengali name for this species

Labeo greenii Boulenger 1902    in honor of artist J. Green, for his contributions to Boulenger’s studies of Congolese fishes (Green may have created the illustrations)

Labeo gregorii Günther 1894    in honor of geologist and explorer John Walter Gregory (1864-1932), who collected type

Labeo horie Heckel 1847    local name for this species in Assuan, Egypt

Labeo indramontri Smith 1945    in honor of Phya Indra Montri, president of the Siam Society for many years, for his “untiring labors in extending the knowledge of the history, culture, and natural resources of Thailand”

Labeo kawrus (Sykes 1839)    Marathi vernacular for this species in India, which, as Sykes explained in 1841, he adopted “so that naturalists who travel the country can always obtain” the species

Labeo kibimbi Poll 1949    Swahili name for this cyprinid

Labeo kirkii Boulenger 1903    in honor of naturalist John Kirk, who collected type

Labeo kontius (Jerdon 1849)    etymology not explained, perhaps from kontus, reduced, referring to “blunt, truncated” muzzle and/or small head

Labeo latebra Moritz & Neumann 2017    Latin for delitescence or seclusion, referring to its remaining unrecognized for such a long time, and because confirming its locality and occurrence was a challenge for more than 10 years

Labeo lineatus Boulenger 1898    lined, referring to dark green and pink stripes on sides of adults (young have dark stripes)

Labeo lividus Roberts & Stewart 1976    black and blue, presumably referring to “dull blue” back and sides compared to “pale-colored or dirty white” back and sides of the closely related L. barbatus

Labeo longipinnis Boulenger 1898    longus, long; pinnis, fin, referring to high dorsal fin, long pectoral and anal fins, and large and deep caudal fin

Labeo lualabaensis Tshibwabwa 1997    ensis, suffix denoting place: Lualaba River, Democratic Republic of the Congo, type locality

Labeo lukulae Boulenger 1902    of Lukula River at Lukula, Democratic Republic of the Congo, type locality

Labeo luluae Fowler 1930    of Lulua River, Democratic Republic of the Congo, type locality

Labeo lunatus Jubb 1963    lunate, referring to crescent-shaped dorsal fin

Labeo macrostoma Boulenger 1898    macro-, long; stoma, mouth, referring to wide mouth, 12/3-2 times in length of head (including lips)

Labeo meroensis Moritz 2007    ensis, suffix denoting place: ancient Nubian capital Meroe, positioned on the Nile between Shendi and Atbara, where types were collected

Labeo microphthalmus Day 1877    micro-, small; ophthalmus, eye, referring to small eyes, smaller in relation to length of head than 19 of the other 24 Labeo species Day included in his monograph

Labeo molybdinus Du Plessis 1963    leaden, derived from vernacular name “leadfish,” referring to dark gray leaden color on back and sides

Labeo moszkowskii Ahl 1922    in honor of physician Max Moszkowski, who explored Sumatra in 1907 and collected type

Labeo nandina (Hamilton 1822)    latinization of Nandin, local Bengali name for this species

Labeo nasus Boulenger 1899    nose, referring to prominent pointed snout, which ends in a small transverse, slightly upturned appendage

Labeo nigricans Boulenger 1911    blackish, referring to dark brown or blackish coloration

Labeo nigripinnis Day 1877    niger, black; pinnis, fin, referring to black fins in adults, “not always so in the young”

Labeo nunensis Pellegrin 1929    ensis, suffix denoting place: Noun River, southern Cameroon, type locality

Labeo pangusia (Hamilton 1822)    latinization of Pangusiya, local Bengali name for this species

Labeo parvus Boulenger 1902    small, one of the smallest Labeo in Africa (13 cm)

Labeo pellegrini Zolezzi 1939    in honor of ichthyologist Jacques Pellegrin (1873-1944), who confirmed the diagnoses of cyprinids described in Zolezzi’s paper

Labeo percivali Boulenger 1912    in honor of Arthur Blaynoy Percival (1875-1941), Game Ranger (later Warden) in Kenya, who collected type

Labeo pierrei (Sauvage 1880)    in honor of “Pierre” (no other information given), who collected type; possibly Louis Pierre, first director of Saigon Botanic Garden

Labeo pietschmanni Machan 1930    patronym not identified but probably in honor of Machan’s Vienna colleague, ichthyologist Viktor Pietschmann (1881-1956)

Labeo polli Tshibwabwa 1997    in honor of Max Poll (1908-1991), the “greatest Belgian ichthyologist since G. A. Boulenger” (translation), for his significant contributions to the knowledge of Congolese fishes

Labeo porcellus (Heckel 1844)    diminutive of porcus, pig, i.e., little pig, probably referring to obtuse snout, which projects beyond lower jaw

Labeo potail (Sykes 1839)    Marathi vernacular for this species in India, which, as Sykes explained in 1841, he adopted “so that naturalists who travel the country can always obtain” the species

Labeo quadribarbis Poll & Gosse 1963    quadri-, four; barbis, beard, referring to two pairs of visible (i.e., not hidden) barbels on each side of mouth

Labeo rajasthanicus Datta & Majumdar 1970    icus, belonging to: Rajasthan, India, type locality

Labeo rectipinnis Tshibwabwa 1997    rectus, straight; pinnis, fin, referring to straight (i.e., not concave) outline of dorsal fin

Labeo reidi Tshibwabwa 1997    in honor of zoologist and zoo director Gordon McGregor Reid (b. 1948), who published a systematic revision of African Labeo in 1985

Labeo ricnorhynchus (McClelland 1839)    riknos, wrinkled; rhynchus, snout, referring to “thick and wrinkled” snout

Labeo rohita (Hamilton 1822)    presumably a local Bengali name, as it was Hamilton’s practice to derive trivial names “from some of those used by the natives of India”

Labeo rosae Steindachner 1894    in honor of Rosa Holub, who participated in the African explorations of her husband, Czech physician, cartographer and ethnographer Emil Holub (1847-1902), who collected type

Labeo roseopunctatus Paugy, Guégan & Agnèse 1990    roseo-, rosy; punctatus, spotted, referring to lines of pink-orange spots on scales above and below lateral line (in living specimens)

Labeo rouaneti Daget 1962    in honor of Raymond Rouanet, Curator, Eaux et Forêts (Waters and Forests), for his role in facilitating Daget’s expeditions in Guinea and/or help collecting fishes

Labeo rubromaculatus Gilchrist & Thompson 1913    rubrum, red; maculatus, spotted, referring to 6-8 gold-red spots said to be present on living specimens but which quickly fade after death

Labeo ruddi Boulenger 1907    in honor of De Beers Mining Company co-founder Charles Dunell Rudd (1844-1916), who financed expedition that collected type

Labeo sanagaensis Tshibwabwa 1997    ensis, suffix denoting place: Sangana River basin, Cameroon, type locality

Labeo seeberi Gilchrist & Thompson 1911    in honor of C. R. Seeber, Chief Constable at Clanwilliam, Western Cape, South Africa, who sent fishes to Gilchrist in 1906, including type of this species

Labeo senegalensis Valenciennes 1842    from Senegal, type locality (species occurs throughout West Africa)

Labeo simpsoni Ricardo-Bertram 1943    in honor of the late Charles Simpson, probably Charles “Chambeshi” Simpson (d. 1937), Nyasaland Superintendent of the African Lakes Corporation, nicknamed for the river that is the type locality of this species

Labeo sorex Nichols & Griscom 1917    Latin for shrew or shrew mouse, probably referring to its minute eyes (and perhaps its presumed burrowing habits)

Labeo stolizkae Steindachner 1870    in honor of paleontologist Ferdinand Stoliczka (1838-1874), who collected type in Myanmar (note variant spelling)

Labeo trigliceps Pellegrin 1926    Trigla, gurnard genus (Triglidae), referring to gurnard-like appearance of ceps, head

Labeo udaipurensis Tilak 1968    from Udaipur, Rajasthan, India, type locality

Labeo umbratus (Smith 1841)    etymology not explained; could mean “covered” (referring to blotches or spots of “gallstone-yellow” on back and sides and/or “several small clusters of minute dots of a chocolate-red colour” on sides), and/or “shaded” (referring to pectoral, anal and ventral fins “shaded with brownish purple-red” and/or eyes “shaded with brownish orange”)

Labeo victorianus Boulenger 1901    anus, belonging to: Lake Victoria drainage, where it is endemic

Labeo vulgaris Heckel 1847    common, referring to presumed common occurrence in Cairo based on the many specimens Heckel received

Labeo werneri Lohberger 1929    patronym not identified but probably in honor of Lohberger’s fellow Austrian and colleague, herpetologist Franz Werner (1867-1939)

Labeo worthingtoni Fowler 1958    in honor of Edward Barton Worthington (1905-2001), pioneer explorer of African lakes and their fisheries, who described this cyprinid in 1933 but used a preoccupied name, L. intermedius Nichols & Griscom 1917 (= L. chariensis)

Labeo yunnanensis Chaudhuri 1911    ensis, suffix denoting place: Yunnan Province, China, type locality

Labeobarbus Rüppell 1835    labeo, one with large lips, i.e., Barbus with “unusually thick fleshly lips” (translation), referring specifically to L. nedgia

Labeobarbus acuticeps (Matthes 1959)    acutus, sharp; ceps, head, referring to very pointed (“très pointu”) snout

Labeobarbus acutirostris (Bini 1940)    acutus, sharp or pointed; rostris, snout, referring to more acute (e.g., narrow) head compared to Barbus brunellii (=L. intermedius)

Labeobarbus aeneus (Burchell 1822)    brazen, referring to body coloration, “Totus aenei coloris”

Labeobarbus altianalis (Boulenger 1900)    altus, high; analis, anal, referring to long anal-fin ray, 5/6 length of head, “nearly reaching caudal when folded”

Labeobarbus altipinnis (Banister & Poll 1973)    altus, high; pinnis, fin, referring to high dorsal fin

Labeobarbus ansorgii (Boulenger 1906)    in honor of explorer William John Ansorge (1850-1913), who collected type

Labeobarbus aspius (Boulenger 1912)    similar in appearance to the European leuciscin Aspius rapax (=A. aspius)

Labeobarbus axelrodi (Getahun, Stiassny & Teugels 2004)    in honor of pet-book publisher Herbert R. Axelrod (1927-2017), for his “continuing generous support for ichthyological research and exploration”

Labeobarbus batesii (Boulenger 1903)    in honor of George Latimer Bates (1863-1940), Cameroon farmer and ornithologist who collected specimens for the Natural History Museum (London), including type of this species

Labeobarbus beso (Rüppell 1835)    local name for this species in the fish markets of Goraza, Lake Tana, Ethiopia

Labeobarbus boulengeri Vreven, Musschoot, Snoeks & Schliewen 2016    in honor of ichthyologist-herpetologist George A. Boulenger (1858-1937), for his “extensive work” on large Barbus and Varicorhinus (both now Labeobarbus) from Angola [replacement name for Varicorhinus latirostris Boulenger 1910, preoccupied by Barbus intermedius latirostris Keilhack 1908 when both are placed in Labeobarbus]

Labeobarbus brauni (Pellegrin 1935)    in honor of Braun (forename not given), who collected type with explorer Guy Babault

Labeobarbus brevicephalus (Nagelkerke & Sibbing 1997)    brevis, short; cephalus, head, more than 4.2 times in standard length

Labeobarbus brevispinis (Holly 1927)    brevis, short; spinis, spine, referring to shorter dorsal fin spine compared to Barbus ruspolii (=L. bynni), which Holly believed were conspecific but divided into two subspecific forms

Labeobarbus bynni bynni (Forsskål 1775)    Arabian vernacular for this barb

Labeobarbus bynni occidentalis (Boulenger 1911)    western, presumably referring to type locality near Lagos, Nigeria, on western coast of Africa

Labeobarbus bynni waldroni (Norman 1935)    probably in honor of Fanny Waldron, a collector for the British Museum (Natural History), who collected type [although Norman named Waldron in his paper, he did not explicitly state that this species was named for her, therefore amendment of spelling to “waldronae” (which reflects correct gender) is not recommended]

Labeobarbus cardozoi (Boulenger 1912)    in honor of José Cardoso (also spelled Cardozo), Governor-General of Angola, for the “help he kindly lent” (translation) explorer William John Ansorge (1850-1913), who collected type

Labeobarbus caudovittatus (Boulenger 1902)    cauda-, tail; vittatus, banded, referring to black band along upper and lower lobes of caudal fin

Labeobarbus clarkeae (Banister 1984)    in honor of Margaret Clarke, fish collection assistant, British Museum (Natural History), who “gave so much assistance during the course” of Banister’s work on the genus

Labeobarbus claudinae (De Vos & Thys van den Audenaerde 1990)    in honor of the late Claudine Mauel, resident of Gisenyi, Rwanda (near type locality), who died in a road accident in December 1985

Labeobarbus codringtonii (Boulenger 1908)    in honor of Thomas Codrington, who, while vistiing his son, Robert Codrington, Administrator of N.W. Rhodesia, “availed himself of the exceptional facilities afforded him to make a very valuable collection of the fishes, which he has presented to the British Museum”

Labeobarbus compiniei (Sauvage 1879)    patronym not identified but probably in honor of Victor de Compiègne (1846-1877), who, with his friend Antoine-Alfred Marche, explored the Ogooue River in Gabon (type locality) from 1872 to 1874

Labeobarbus crassibarbis (Nagelkerke & Sibbing 1997)    crassus, thick or fat; barbus, beard, referring to “very thick” barbels

Labeobarbus dainellii (Bini 1940)    in honor of geographer Giotto Dainelli (1878-1968), who led expedition that collected type

Labeobarbus dartevellei (Poll 1945)    in honor of geologist Edmond Dartevelle, who collected type

Labeobarbus dimidiatus (Tweddle & Skelton 1998)    halved or divided, referring to sharp contrast between dorsal (golden olive) and ventral (golden yellow) coloration

Labeobarbus ensifer (Boulenger 1910)    ensis, sword; fero, to bear, probably referring to “very strong, bony, not serrated, straight” last simple ray of dorsal fin

Labeobarbus ensis (Boulenger 1910)    sword, presumably referring to “extremely strong, bony, not serrated” last simple ray of dorsal fin

Labeobarbus ethiopicus (Zolezzi 1939)    Ethiopian, referring to country where it is endemic

Labeobarbus fasolt (Pappenheim 1914)    named after Fasolt, a giant in Wagner’s “The Ring of the Nibelung,” referring to large size (50 cm SL) of type specimen

Labeobarbus fimbriatus (Holly 1926)    fringed, allusion not evident

Labeobarbus fritschii (Günther 1874)    in honor of biologist and natural history collector Freiherrn von Fritsch, who, along with J. J. Rein (see L. reinii), collected type in Morocco

Labeobarbus gananensis (Vinciguerra 1895)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Ganana River, Somalia, one of the type localities

Labeobarbus gestetneri (Banister & Bailey 1979)    in honor of the boat David Gestetner, used by the team to during their Zäire River expedition

Labeobarbus girardi (Boulenger 1910)    in honor of Albert Girard (1860-1914), director of the Lisbon Museum

Labeobarbus gorgorensis (Bini 1940)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Gorgora, north shore of Lake Tana, Ethiopia, type locality

Labeobarbus gorguari (Rüppell 1835)    local name for this species at Lake Tana, Ethiopia

Labeobarbus gruveli (Pellegrin 1911)    in honor of biologist Abel Gruvel, who collected type

Labeobarbus gulielmi (Boulenger 1910)    in honor of explorer William John Ansorge (1850-1913), who collected type (Gulielm is the Welsh precursor to William)

Labeobarbus habereri (Steindachner 1912)    in honor of German physician and natural history collector Karl Albert Haberer, who collected type

Labeobarbus harterti (Günther 1901)    in honor of ornithologist Ernst Hartert (1859-1933), who collected type

Labeobarbus huloti (Banister 1976)    in honor of M. (Monsieur) Hulot (no other information provided), who collected type, possibly A. Hulot, Institut National pour l’Etude Agronomique du Congo, who collected type of Brachypetersius huloti (Characiformes: Alestidae) in the Congo River basin in 1946

Labeobarbus humphri (Banister 1976)    in honor of Peter Humphry Greenwood (1927-1995), for his services to African ichthyology

Labeobarbus intermedius (Rüppell 1835)    intermediate, being more elongate than L. surkis but less elongate than Barbus affinis (now a synonym of L. intermedius)

Labeobarbus iphthimostoma (Banister & Poll 1973)    iphthimos, stout; stoma, mouth, referring to very large mouth

Labeobarbus iturii (Holly 1929)    of Ituri River, Zaire (now Democratic Republic of the Congo), type locality

Labeobarbus jaegeri (Holly 1930)    patronym not identified; one guess would be Gustav Jäger (1832-1917), a German-born naturalist who taught in Vienna

Labeobarbus johnstonii (Boulenger 1907)    in honor of Sir Harry Johnston (1858-1927), British explorer, botanist, linguist and colonial administrator, who “presented” type

Labeobarbus jubae (Banister 1984)    of Juba River, Ethiopia, where it is endemic

Labeobarbus jubbi (Poll 1967)    in honor of Rex A. Jubb, Freshwater Fish Section, Albany Museum, Grahamstown, South Africa

Labeobarbus kimberleyensis (Gilchrist & Thompson 1913)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Kimberley Reservoir, Cape Province, South Africa, type locality

Labeobarbus lagensis (Günther 1868)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Lagos, Nigeria, type locality (an apparent misspelling of lagoensis)

Labeobarbus latirostris (Keilhack 1908)    latus, wide; rhynchus, snout; proposed as a subspecies of Barbus (now L.) intermedius, referring to larger interorbital width compared to another subspecies, B. i. eurystomus (now L. johnstonii)

Labeobarbus leleupanus (Matthes 1959)    anus, belonging to: entomologist Narcisse Leleup (1912-2001), Institut pour la Recherche Scientifique en Afrique Centrale, who collected type

Labeobarbus lobogenysoides (Pellegrin 1935)    –oides, having the form of: Barbus lobogenys (=L. altianalis), both of which have “exaggerated” (translation) lips and barbels [also known as L. paucisquamata (Pellegrin 1935), preoccupied by Barbus mohasicus paucisquamata Pellegrin 1933]

Labeobarbus longidorsalis (Pellegrin 1935)    longus, long; dorsalis, back, referring to longer dorsal fin compared to V. tornieri

Labeobarbus longifilis (Pellegrin 1935)    longus, long; filum, thread, referring to “extremely elongated” (translation) barbels, longer than those on D. altianalis

Labeobarbus longissimus (Nagelkerke & Sibbing 1997)    very long, referring to elongate and slender body

Labeobarbus lucius (Boulenger 1910)    pike, presumably referring to elongate, pike-like shape

Labeobarbus lufupensis (Banister & Bailey 1979)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Lufupa River, Shaba, Democratic Republic of the Congo, where type was purchased from fishermen

Labeobarbus macroceps (Fowler 1936)    macro-, long; ceps, head, referring to long head, 27/8 times in body length

Labeobarbus macrolepidotus (Pellegrin 1928)    macro-, long; lepidotus, scaled, referring to larger scales compared to L. semireticulatus

Labeobarbus macrolepis (Pfeffer 1889)    macro-, long; lepis, scale, referring to “extremely large” (translation) scales

Labeobarbus macrophtalmus (Bini 1940)    macro-, long; opthalmus, eye, referring to larger eyes compared to L. gorguari

Labeobarbus malacanthus (Pappenheim 1911)    malakos, soft; acanthus, spine, probably referring to flexible, unserrated last simple fin ray, which is ossified only at base

Labeobarbus marequensis (Smith 1841)    ensis, suffix denoting place: presumably a variant or latinized spelling of Marico, referring to Marico River, South Africa, which Smith visited and where species occurs

Labeobarbus mariae (Holly 1926)    matronym not identified nor can identity be inferred from available evidence; however, “Maria” must have been important to Holly because he gave two other fishes the same honorific: Barbus mariae (=Labeobarbus rhinoceros) and Stomatepia mariae (Cichlidae) [see also L. matris, below]

Labeobarbus matris (Holly 1928)    genitive of mater, mother, allusion not explained (it is interesting to note that Holly named three African fishes “mariae,” including L. mariae [see above] and Barbus mariae [=L. rhinoceros], without identifying who she was, and an Asian catfish genus [Sperata, Bagridae] in honor of his mother-in-law, named Maria Adolfine Spera; could “mother” and Maria and the mother-in-law all be the same person?)

Labeobarbus mawambi (Pappenheim 1914)    referring to type locality in Mawambi, Democratic Republic of the Congo

Labeobarbus mawambiensis (Steindachner 1911)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Mawambi, Democratic Republic of the Congo

Labeobarbus mbami (Holly 1927)    referring to Mbami River, Cameroon, type locality

Labeobarbus megastoma (Nagelkerke & Sibbing 1997)    mega-, great; stoma, mouth, referring to “very large” mouth

Labeobarbus micronema (Boulenger 1904)    micro-, small; nema, thread, referring to “quite minute” barbels

Labeobarbus mirabilis (Pappenheim 1914)    wonderful or strange, allusion not evident

Labeobarbus mungoensis (Trewavas 1974)    ensis, suffix denoting place: the Mungo River system, Cameroon, type locality

Labeobarbus nanningsi de Beaufort 1933    presumably in honor of M. (Monsieur) and/or Mme. (Madam) Nannings (forenames not given), who collected type [since de Beaufort did not explicitly state for whom it was named, correction of spelling to “nanningsorum” (which would honor both) is not recommended]

Labeobarbus natalensis (Castelnau 1861)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Natal, South Africa, type locality

Labeobarbus nedgia Rüppell 1835    local name for this species at Lake Tana, Ethiopia

Labeobarbus nelspruitensis (Gilchrist & Thompson 1911)   ensis, suffix denoting place: Nelspruit, Transvaal (now Gauteng), South Africa, type locality

Labeobarbus nthuwa Tweddle & Skelton 2008    vernacular name for this species near the town of Rumphi, Malawi, where it occurs (pronounced ntoowa)

Labeobarbus osseensis (Nagelkerke & Sibbing 2000)    ensis, suffix denoting place but name is a patronym, in honor of J. W. M. Osse, who helped initiate authors’ research on Lake Tana (Ethiopia) Barbus, for his “knowledge on many aspects of biology, his stimulating criticism of the work, and his original ideas about approaching practical and scientific challenges in the field”

Labeobarbus oxyrhynchus (Pfeffer 1889)    oxy, sharp; rhynchus, snout, referring to “strongly convex” (translation) snout

Labeobarbus pagenstecheri (Fischer 1884)    in honor of entomologist Arnold Andreas Friedrich Pagenstecher (1837-1913), director of the Naturhistorischen Museum in Hamburg

Labeobarbus parawaldroni (Lévêque, Thys van den Audenaerde & Traoré 1987)    para-, near, referring to similar appearance to L. bynni waldroni

Labeobarbus pellegrini (Bertin & Estève 1948)    in honor of Jacques Pellegrin (1873-1944), who described this species in 1932 as Varicorhinus babaulti, considered preoccupied by Barbus (Capoeta) babaulti Pellegrin 1926 (=Labeobarbus oxyrhynchus)

Labeobarbus petitjeani (Daget 1962)    in honor of M. (Monsieur) Petitjean (forename not given), for his role in facilitating Daget’s missions in Guinea and/or help collecting fishes

Labeobarbus platydorsus (Nagelkerke & Sibbing 1997)    platy, broad or wide; dorsum, back, a “relatively” wide-bodied species

Labeobarbus platyrhinus (Boulenger 1900)    platy, broad; rhinus, snout, referring to “broad and rounded” snout

Labeobarbus platystomus (Pappenheim 1914)    platys, wide; stomus, mouth, referring to “enormously wide” (translation) mouth

Labeobarbus pojeri (Poll 1944)    in honor of Dr. G. Pojer (a Belgian scientist, no other information available), who collected type

Labeobarbus polylepis (Boulenger 1907)    poly, many; lepis, scale, referring to small (and therefore more numerous) scales, 43 along lateral line

Labeobarbus progenys (Boulenger 1903)    pro-, before; genys, jaw, referring to lower jaw projecting beyond the upper

Labeobarbus pungweensis (Jubb 1959)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Pungwe River, Inyangea District, Zimbabwe, type locality

Labeobarbus reinii (Günther 1874)    in honor of biologist and natural history collector J. J. Rein, who, along with Freiherrn von Fritsch (see L. fritschii), collected type in Morocco

Labeobarbus rhinoceros (Copley 1938)    called the “Rhino Fish,” referring to “pronounced horn” on snout, which, according to Copley (1941), “rises when the mouth is protracted” [previously known as Barbus mariae Holly 1929 but preoccupied by Varicorhinus mariae Holly 1926 when both are placed in Labeobarbus]

Labeobarbus rhinophorus (Boulenger 1910)    rhinos, nose; phoreus, bearing, referring to pointed snout, “terminating in a rounded dermal pad projecting strongly beyond the mouth”

Labeobarbus robertsi (Banister 1984)    in honor of ichthyologist and collector Tyson R. Roberts (b. 1940)

Labeobarbus rocadasi (Boulenger 1910)    in honor of Lieut.-Col. Jose Augusto Roçadas (1865-1926), Governor-General of Angola, for the “kind assistance” he offered explorer William John Ansorge (1850-1913), who collected type

Labeobarbus rosae (Boulenger 1910)    in honor of the Vicar Padre Anastacio Luis Rosa, for “helpful courtesy during a seven years’ friendship” with explorer William John Ansorge (1850-1913), who collected type

Labeobarbus roylii (Boulenger 1912)    in honor of Harry Royle, an agent with the Liverpool firm Hutton and Cookson, whose “warm welcome” (translation) and other services (not specified) greatly assisted explorer William John Ansorge (1850-1913), who collected type

Labeobarbus ruandae (Pappenheim 1914)    of Rwanda, where it is endemic

Labeobarbus ruwenzorii (Pellegrin 1909)    of Ruvenzori (now Rwenzori) Mountains, east-central Africa, where species inhabits fast, turbulent waters

Labeobarbus ruasae (Pappenheim 1914)    of Ruasa, referring to type locality in northwest Rwanda

Labeobarbus sacratus (Daget 1963)    holy or consecrated, allusion not explained but here is a fanciful guess: species occurs in Mount Nimba Strict Nature Reserve, “strict” meaning that no tourism is allowed, and hence serves as a “holy land” for, or is “consecrated” to the conservation of, its flora and fauna

Labeobarbus sandersi (Boulenger 1912)    in honor of M.C. Sanders, who assisted explorer William John Ansorge (1850-1913) in the Congo expedition that collected many fishes, including type of this one

Labeobarbus seeberi (Gilchrist & Thompson 1913)    in honor of C. R. Seeber, Chief Constable at Clanwilliam, Western Cape, South Africa, who collected type

Labeobarbus semireticulatus (Pellegrin 1924)    semi-, half; reticulatus, net-like, referring to scales on back being darker at the base, giving upper half a reticulated appearance

Labeobarbus somereni (Boulenger 1911)    in honor of dentist and entomologist Victor Gurney Logan Van Someren (1886-1976), who “obtained” type in a “snow-water” stream at 6000 feet on Mt. Ruwenzori, Uganda

Labeobarbus stappersii (Boulenger 1915)    in honor of Louis Stappers of the Belgian government, who led an expedition to Lakes Tanganyika and Moero in 1911-1913 and collected type

Labeobarbus steindachneri (Boulenger 1910)    in honor of Austrian ichthyologist Franz Steindachner (1834-1919), this species being “very closely allied” to one described by him as L. tornieri

Labeobarbus stenostoma (Boulenger 1910)    stenos, narrow; stoma, mouth, referring to narrow mouth, its width 2/7 length of head

Labeobarbus surkis (Rüppell 1835)    name for this species among the native fishermen of Lake Tana, Ethiopia

Labeobarbus tornieri (Steindachner 1906)    in honor of zoologist and paleontologist Gustav Tornier (1858-1938)

Labeobarbus tropidolepis (Boulenger 1900)    tropidos, keel; lepis, scale, referring to median swelling or obtuse keel on scales (at least those below lateral line on caudal portion of body) of most specimens, which form very regular longitudinal lines

Labeobarbus truttiformis (Nagelkerke & Sibbing 1997)    trutta, trout; forma, form, referring to trout-like appearance

Labeobarbus tsanensis (Nagelkerke & Sibbing 1997)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Tsana, or Lake Tana, Ethiopia, where it is abundant (and endemic)

Labeobarbus upembensis (Banister & Bailey 1979)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Upemba National Park, Democratic Republic of the Congo, type locality

Labeobarbus urotaenia (Boulenger 1913)   oura-, tail; taeniata, banded, referring to poorly defined lateral brown band that extends onto lower lobe of caudal fin

Labeobarbus varicostoma (Boulenger 1910)    varicose, swollen; stoma, mouth, probably referring to thick upper lip covered with round papillae

Labeobarbus versluysii (Holly 1929)    patronym not identified but probably in honor of zoologist and anatomist January Versluys (1873-1939), University of Vienna

Labeobarbus werneri (Holly 1929)    patronym not identified but probably in honor of Holly’s fellow Austrian and colleague, herpetologist Franz Werner (1867-1939)

Labeobarbus wittei (Banister & Poll 1973)    in honor of herpetologist Gaston François De Witte (1897-1980), who collected type

Labeobarbus wurtzi (Pellegrin 1908)    in honor of “M. le Docteur Wurtz” (full identity unknown), who collected type while traveling in French Guinea; Pellegrin was impressed by how Dr. Wurtz recorded life colors of his specimens before placing them in alcohol

Labeobarbus xyrocheilus (Tweddle & Skelton 1998)    xyron, razor; cheilos, lip, referring to sharp scraping edge on lower lip

Labiobarbus van Hasselt 1823    combination of Labeo (“with 4 small barbels”) and Barbus (“a single dorsal fin of which the second ray is not serrated”) [translations; van Hasselt consistently used the spelling Labio-, therefore Labeobarbus Rüppell is not a junior homonym]

Labiobarbus fasciatus (Bleeker 1853)    banded, referring to dark-violet spots at base of lateral line scales that form a band extending from head to tail

Labiobarbus festivus (Heckel 1843)    handsome, allusion not explained, probably referring to blackish bands on caudal fin lobes

Labiobarbus lamellifer Kottelat 1995    lamella, diminutive of lamina, a thin plate; fero, to bear, referring to outer gill rakers on first arch, which are flattened in a plane perpendicular to gill arch

Labiobarbus leptocheilus (Valenciennes 1842)    leptos, fine or thin; cheilus, lip, referring to small, slightly fleshy lips

Labiobarbus ocellatus (Heckel 1843)    with eye-like spots, referring to blackish-violet spots, ringed by yellow, under scapuler girdle and at caudal fin base

Labiobarbus sabanus (Inger & Chin 1962)    anus, belonging to: Sabah, local name for North Borneo, where it is endemic

Labiobarbus siamensis (Sauvage 1881)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Siam, or Thailand, referring to type localities in Petchaburi (Pexabury) and Bangkok

Labiobarbus spilopleura Smith 1934    spilos, spot or stain; pleura, of the side, referring to diamond-shaped spot over pectoral fin

Laocypris Kottelat 2000    Laos, country where genus is endemic; cypris, a small carp, a common suffix for cyprinid genera

Laocypris hispida Kottelat 2000    bristly or spiky, presumably referring to conspicuous tubercles on lower jaw, snout, cheeks, top of head, scales on lower half of body behind pelvic-fin origin and base of anterior anal-fin ray

Lepidopygopsis Raj 1941    lepido-, scaled; pygopsis, presumably referring to Schizopygopsis, to which it “bears some resemblance” but is “readily distinguished” by presence of scales on caudal portion of body

Lepidopygopsis typus Raj 1941    serving as type of genus

Linichthys Zhang & Fang 2005    in honor of R.-D. Lin, first author of original description of type species, L. laticeps; ichthys, fish

Linichthys laticeps (Lin & Zhang 1986)    latus, wide; ceps, head, referring to broad and flattened head

Lobocheilos Bleeker 1854    lobus, rounded projection or protuberance; cheilos, lip, referring to rostral cap covering most of upper lip

Lobocheilos bo (Popta 1904)    named after Bö River, Kapuas River basin, Borneo, type locality

Lobocheilos erinaceus Kottelat & Tan 2008    hedgehog, allusion not explained, perhaps referring to large conical tubercles on tip of snout and rostral cap

Lobocheilos falcifer (Valenciennes 1842)    falcatus, sickle-shaped; fero, to bear, referring to falcate dorsal fin

Lobocheilos ixocheilos Kottelat & Tan 2008    ix, phonetic spelling of letter x, referring to “long-lasting uncertainties of the identity of the species” (i.e., its “x-factor”?); cheilos, lip or mouth, “a common suffix used in names of cyprinid genera”

Lobocheilos kajanensis (Popta 1904)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Kayan River, central Borneo, type locality

Lobocheilos lehat Bleeker 1858    Sundanese vernacular for this species in Java, Indonesia

Lobocheilos ovalis Kottelat & Tan 2008    oval, referring to oval, vertically elongated black blotch at end of caudal peduncle (especially distinct in adults)

Lobocheilos rhabdoura (Fowler 1934)    rhabdotos, streaked; oura, tail, referring to dark axial streak on tail ending in a dark blotch at caudal base

Lobocheilos schwanefeldii Bleeker 1854    in honor of military surgeon H. W. Schwanefeld, who collected type (also spelled schwanenfeldii, an inadvertent error on Bleeker’s part)

Lobocheilos tenura Kottelat & Tan 2008    tenuis, slender; oura, tail, referring to slender caudal peduncle

Lobocheilos terminalis Kottelat & Tan 2008    referring to almost terminal position of mouth

Lobocheilos unicornis Kottelat & Tan 2008    like a unicorn, referring to conspicuous anterodorsal projection on top of head on females larger than 130 mm SL

Longanalus Li 2006    longus, long; analus, anal, referring unique anal fin among Chinese labeonines, with seven soft rays instead of five

Longanalus macrochirous Li, Ran & Chen 2006    macro-, long; cheiros, hand, presumably referring to well-developed pectoral fins, which extend to pelvic point

Luciobarbus Heckel 1843    lucius, pike, i.e., a Barbus with a pike-like pointed snout

Luciobarbus albanicus (Steindachner 1870)    icus, belonging to: Albania, referring to Lake Scutari (Lake Iannina), Albania, type locality (also occurs in Greece)

Luciobarbus barbulus (Heckel 1847)    probably a diminutive of barbus, i.e., small barbel, referring to very short lobule at symphysis of lower lip

Luciobarbus bocagei (Steindachner 1864)    in honor of José Vicente Barbosa du Bocage (1823-1907), curator of Zoology at the Museum of Natural History in Lisbon, which published Steindachner’s catalog of Portuguese fishes

Luciobarbus brachycephalus (Kessler 1872)    brachys, short; cephalus, head, 5.5 in total length, 4.5 in standard length

Luciobarbus callensis (Valenciennes 1842)    ensis, suffix denoting place: a lake near La Calle, Algeria, type locality

Luciobarbus capito (Güldenstädt 1773)    large head, referring to “longer head” (translation) compared to Cyprinus (=Barbus) barbus, its presumed congener at time of description

Luciobarbus caspius (Berg 1914)    Caspian, referring to southern and western Caspian Sea basin, where it is endemic

Luciobarbus chelifensis Brahimi, Freyhof, Henrard & Libois 2017    ensis, suffix denoting place: Chelif River drainage, northwestern Algeria, where it is endemic

Luciobarbus comizo (Steindachner 1864)    vernacular used by fishermen in Toledo, Spain (also spelled comiza)

Luciobarbus escherichii (Steindachner 1897)    in honor of entomologist Karl L. Escherich (1871-1951), who collected type

Luciobarbus esocinus Heckel 1843    pike-like, referring to produced snout and flat forehead, similar to pikes (Esox, Esocidae)

Luciobarbus figuigensis (Pellegrin 1913)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Oasis de Figuig, Morocco, type locality

Luciobarbus graecus (Steindachner 1895)    Greek, referring to country where it is endemic

Luciobarbus graellsii (Steindachner 1866)    in honor of zoologist Mariano de la Paz Graëlls y de la Aguera (1809-1898), whose work on the fishes of Spain is cited several times by Steindachner

Luciobarbus guercifensis Doadrio, Perea & Yahyaoui 2016    –ensis, suffix denoting place: Guercif, a village in Morocco, where it is mainly distributed

Luciobarbus guiraonis (Steindachner 1866)    is, genitive singular of: Prof. Angel Guirao, thanking him for “kindness and friendship” (translation) during Steindachner’s short stay in Murcia, Spain

Luciobarbus issenensis (Pellegrin 1922)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Oued (=Valley) Issen, Morocco, type locality

Luciobarbus kersin (Heckel 1843)    Arabic vernacular for this barb in Syria

Luciobarbus kosswigi (Karaman 1971)    in honor of Turkish zoologist and geneticist Curt Kosswig (1903-1982), who collected type

Luciobarbus kottelati Turan, Ekmekçi, Ilhan & Engin 2008    in honor of Swiss ichthyologist Maurice Kottelat (b. 1957), for his contributions to the knowledge of European and Asian fishes

Luciobarbus ksibi (Boulenger 1905)    of Wed Ksib, Morocco, type locality

Luciobarbus lepineyi (Pellegrin 1939)    in honor of entomologist J. De Lépiney, who collected type

Luciobarbus leptopogon (Schimper 1834)    leptos, small, thin or delicate, probably referring to “finer and smaller scales” (translation) compared to other Barbus (original genus) known by Schimper; pogon, beard, presumably referring to characteristic barbels of Barbus

Luciobarbus longiceps (Valenciennes 1842)    longus, long; ceps, head, measuring ¼ of total length of body

Luciobarbus lorteti (Sauvage 1882)    patronym not identified, probably in honor of Louis Charles Émile Lortet (1836-1909), prominent physician, botanist, zoologist, paleontologist, Egyptologist and anthropologist

Luciobarbus lydianus (Boulenger 1896)    anus, belonging to: Lydia, Iron Age kingdom now generally located in the modern Turkish provinces of Manisa and Izmir (the latter being the type locality)

Luciobarbus maghrebensis Doadrio, Perea & Yahyaoui 2015    –ensis, suffix denoting place: mainly distributed in the northwestern area of the Maghreb region of Morocco

Luciobarbus magniatlantis (Pellegrin 1919)    magnum, great; atlantis, genitive singular of Atlas, referring to the Great (or High) Atlas Mountains of Morocco, where it occurs

Luciobarbus mascarensis Brahimi, Freyhof, Henrard & Libois 2017    ensis, suffix denoting place: Mascara region in western Algeria, where type locality (Macta River drainage) is situated

Luciobarbus massaensis (Pellegrin 1922)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Oued (=Valley) Massa, Morocco, type locality

Luciobarbus microcephalus (Almaça 1967)    micro-, small; cephalus, head, referring to small head, 2.5-2.6 times length of snout and 1.7 times length of dorsal fin base

Luciobarbus mursa (Güldenstädt 1773)    vernacular for this species in Georgia and Azerbaijan (also spelled murtsa)

Luciobarbus mystaceus (Pallas 1814)    mustached, referring to longer barbels (“cirrhis longioribus”) compared to L. mursa

Luciobarbus nasus (Günther 1874)    nose, referring to “very long [snout], much pointed, as long as the postorbital portion of the head”

Luciobarbus pallaryi (Pellegrin 1919)    in honor of malacologist Paul Maurice Pallary (1869-1942), who collected type

Luciobarbus pectoralis (Heckel 1843)    pectoral, i.e., chest region, referring to small scales on breastplate (“squamis pectoralibus minimis”)

Luciobarbus pergamonensis Karaman 1971    ensis, suffix denoting place: Pergamon, ancient predecessor of Bergama, Turkey, type locality

Luciobarbus rabatensis Doadrio, Perea & Yahyaoui 2015    –ensis, suffix denoting place: distribution area mainly comprises the Bou Regreg Basin of northern Morocco, which flows through Rabat City

Luciobarbus rifensis Doadrio, Casal-Lopez & Yahyaoui 2015    –ensis, suffix denoting place: distribution range comprises the Rifian Mountains of Morocco

Luciobarbus sclateri (Günther 1868)    in honor of lawyer and zoologist Philip L. Sclater (1829-1913), who presented type to the British Museum (Natural History)

Luciobarbus steindachneri (Almaça 1967)    in honor of Austrian ichthyologist Franz Steindachner (1834-1919), who was the first to document the occurrence of Barbus (genus in which this species was described) in Portugal

Luciobarbus subquincunciatus (Günther 1868)    sub, somewhat; quincunx, a geometric pattern consisting of five coplanar points, referring to series of black spots on back and sides, “being irregularly quincuncially arranged”

Luciobarbus xanthopterus Heckel 1843    xantho-, yellow; pterus, fin, referring to all-yellow fins (“pinnis omnibus citrinis”)

Luciobarbus yahyaouii Doadrio, Casal-López & Perea 2016    in honor of Ahmed Yahyaoui, Mohammed V-Agdal University (Rabat), for contributions to the knowledge of the fishes of Morocco and North Africa

Luciobarbus zayanensis Doadrio, Casal-López & Yahyaoui 2016    –ensis, suffix denoting place: mainly distributed around Middle Atlas region of Morocco, in an area inhabited by the Zayanes shepherds

Luciocyprinus Vaillant 1904    lucius, pike, i.e., a pike-shaped cyprinus, or carp

Luciocyprinus langsoni Vaillant 1904    of Lang-Son, Upper Tonkin, northern Viêt Nam, type locality

Luciocyprinus striolatus Cui & Chu 1986    striae, fine lines; latus, side, referring to 5-8 longitudinal black lines on upper sides of body