Order CYPRINIFORMES: Family CYPRINIDAE: Subfamily DANIONINAE

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v. 17.0 – 15 Feb.  view/download PDF

Subfamily DANIONINAE
41 genera • 354 species
Taxonomic note: includes taxa historically placed in subfamily Rasborinae.           

Amblypharyngodon Bleeker 1860    amblys, blunt; pharynx, throat; odon, tooth, referring to molar-like pharyngeal teeth, with flat or concave crowns

Amblypharyngodon atkinsonii (Blyth 1860)    patronym not identified but possibly in honor of entomologist Edwin Thomas Atkinson (1840-1890), who joined the Indian Civil Service in 1862 and made many natural history collections in India and Southeast Asia

Amblypharyngodon chulabhornae Vidthayanon & Kottelat 1990     in honor of H.R.H. Princess Chulabhorn Mahidol (b. 1957) of Thailand, for her “interest and patronage of research and development in science and technology, including biology and fisheries”

Amblypharyngodon melettinus (Valenciennes 1844)    sprat-like, resembling mélettine, a sprat or small herring from the French coasts of Saintonge and Brittany

Amblypharyngodon microlepis (Bleeker 1853)    micro-, small; lepis, scale, presumably referring to smaller number of longitudinal and transverse scales compared to A. mola

Amblypharyngodon mola (Hamilton 1822)    presumably a local Bengali name, as it was Hamilton’s practice to derive trivial names “from some of those used by the natives of India”

Barilius Hamilton 1822    latinization of barila, local Bengali name for B. barila

Barilius ardens Knight, Rai, D’Souza & Vijaykrishnan 2015    burning, referring to flame-like colors in mature males   

Barilius bakeri Day 1865    in honor of missionary Henry Baker, Jr., who “obtained several specimens” from Mundikyum, Cochin, India

Barilius barila (Hamilton 1822)    local Bengali name for this species

Barilius bendelisis (Hamilton 1807)    latinization of Bendelisi, Telugu (official language of Andhra Pradesh, India) name for this fish

Barilius bonarensis Chaudhuri 1912    ensis, suffix denoting place: Bonar, Gharwal, Uttar Pradesh, western Himalayas, India, type locality

Barilius canarensis (Jerdon 1849)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Canara, southern India, type locality

Barilius dimorphicus Tilak & Husain 1990    sexually dimorphic (mature males possess anterior scales studded with fine tubercles)

Barilius evezardi Day 1872    in honor of Col. George C. Evezard, Bombay Staff Corps, who assisted in or facilitated the collection of natural history specimens in Puna, India

Barilius gatensis (Valenciennes 1844)    –ensis, suffix denoting place: Mountains of Gates, India, type locality

Barilius lairokensis Arunkumar & Tombi Singh 2000    ensis, suffix denoting place: Lairok Maru, Moreh, Chandel district, Manipur, India, type locality

Barilius malabaricus (Jerdon 1849)    icus, belonging to: Malabar (i.e., southern India), type locality

Barilius mesopotamicus Berg 1932    Mesopotamian, referring to distribution in Tigris and Euphrates river systems

Barilius modestus Day 1872    unassuming, allusion not explained, perhaps referring to less-vivid coloration compared to Opsarius bicirratus (= Barilius vagra)

Barilius naseeri Mirza, Rafiq & Awan 1986    in memory of the authors’ late professor, Khan Naseerud-Din Ahmad, former head of the Department of Zoology, Government College, Lahore, Pakistan

Barilius nelsoni Barman 1988    in honor of Joseph S. Nelson (1937-2011), University of Alberta, for his “valuable contribution to the study of the fishes of the world”

Barilius pakistanicus Mirza & Sadiq 1978    icus, belonging to: Pakistan; described as a Pakistani subspecies of B. vagra (also occurs in Kashmir)

Barilius pectoralis Husain 2012    pectoral, referring to fan-shaped pectoral fins with deep notch at third ray          

Barilius profundus Dishma & Vishwanath 2012    deep, referring to great body depth at dorsal-fin origin

Barilius radiolatus Günther 1868    radiated, referring to scales with numerous distinct radiating striae

Barilius shacra (Hamilton 1822)    presumably a local Bengali name, as it was Hamilton’s practice to derive trivial names “from some of those used by the natives of India”

Barilius vagra (Hamilton 1822)    local Bengali name for this species

Bengala Gray 1834    name dates from plate with no written description, but it undoubtedly refers to Bengal, or India, where B. elanga is endemic [sometimes misspelled Bengana]

Bengala elanga (Hamilton 1822)    Elanga, Assamese name for this “beautiful fish pretty common in the rivers and ponds of Bengal”

Betadevario Pramod, Fang, Rema Devi, Liao, Indra, Jameela Beevi & Kullander 2010    beta, second, i.e., a “second Devario,” referring to resemblance to that genus; beta also refers to Beta Mahatvara, “who made great efforts to make the material available for this study”

Betadevario ramachandrani Pramod, Fang, Rema Devi, Liao, Indra, Jameela Beevi & Kullander 2010    in honor of Alappat Ramachandran, School of Industrial Fisheries, Cochin University of Science and Technology, Kochi, India, for his contributions to fisheries and seafood production management and studies on indigenous ornamental fishes

Boraras Kottelat & Vidthayanon 1993    anagram of Rasbora, referring to their reversed ratio of abdominal and caudal vertebrae

Boraras brigittae (Vogt 1978)    in honor of Vogt’s wife, Brigitte

Boraras maculatus (Duncker 1904)    spotted, referring to large black spot on side between thorax and dorsal fin, and small black spots near caudal and anal fins

Boraras merah (Kottelat 1991)    Indonesian word for red, referring to reddish-brown ground coloration

Boraras micros Kottelat & Vidthayanon 1993    small, reaching 13.3 mm SL

Boraras naevus Conway & Kottelat 2011    spot or blemish, referring to blotch on side of body, much larger on males

Boraras urophthalmoides (Kottelat 1991)    oides, having the appearance of: referring to misidentification as Rasbora urophthalma in Brittan’s 1954 revision of Rasbora and subsequent aquarium literature

Brevibora Liao, Kullander & Fang 2010    brevis, short; bora, from Rasbora, genus from which Brevibora is split, referring fewer predorsal vertebrae compared to other rasborins

Brevibora cheeya Liao & Tan 2011    Cheeya (chee, short; ya, honorable title for respected person), taller of two Chinese deities who hunt ghosts for Yama, referring to relatively larger size compared to B. dorsiocellata

Brevibora dorsiocellata (Duncker 1904)    dorsio-, dorsal; ocellatus, eyespot, referring to large black spot on dorsal fin

Brevibora exilis Liao & Tan 2014    meager, referring to more slender body compared to congeners

Cabdio Hamilton 1822    derived from Kavdi, “one of many names” along the Ganges River “given to the most common species”

Cabdio morar (Hamilton 1822)    variant of morur, local name for this fish along the Ganges River drainage

Cabdio ukhrulensis (Selim & Vishwanath 2001)    –ensis, suffix denoting place: Ukhrul District, Manipur, India, type locality

Chela Hamilton 1822    one of two local Bengali names for C. cachius (the other is Kachhi)

Chela cachius (Hamilton 1822)    latinization of Kachhi, local Bengali name for this species  [simultaneous synonym of atpar, which may have precedence]

Chela khujairokensis Arunkumar 2000    ensis, suffix denoting place: Khujairok stream, tributary of Yu River, Manipur, India, type locality

Chela macrolepis Knight & Rema Devi 2014    macro-, large; lepis, scale, referring to larger scales compared to C. atpar (=cachius)

Chelaethiops Boulenger 1899    Chela, a similar genus from India; Æthiops, Latin for Ethiopian or Negro (from the Greek aithein, to burn and ops, face), possibly referring to Aethiopia, a classical term for Sub-Saharan Africa, i.e, an “Ethiopian” Chela

Chelaethiops bibie (Joannis 1835)    presumably Arabic vernacular for this species used along the Nile River

Chelaethiops congicus (Nichols & Griscom 1917)    icus, belonging to: referring to distribution in the Congo River system

Chelaethiops elongatus Boulenger 1899    referring to elongate body and/or elongate anal and pectoral fins

Chelaethiops minutus (Boulenger 1906)    minute, referring to small size, up to 2.6 cm TL

Chelaethiops rukwaensis (Ricardo 1939) ensis, suffix denoting place: Lake Rukwa, Tanzania, where it is endemic

Danio Hamilton 1822    latinization of Dhani, local Bengali name for small minnows that have the “strongest resemblance” to the Old World leuciscin Phoxinus phoxinus

Danio absconditus Kullander & Britz 2015   Latin for disguised, secret or hidden, referring to color pattern, which strongly resembles that of barred species of Devario, and to its relatively late discovery and recognition as a species

Danio aesculapii Kullander & Fang 2009    of Aesculapius, ancient Greek god of medicine, who was equipped with a staff with one or two snakes wrapped around it, referring to snakeskin pattern and “snakeskin” epithet used in the European aquarium trade

Danio albolineatus (Blyth 1860)    albus, white; lineatus, lined, referring to light band from caudal fin base that extends forward and tapers beyond commencement of dorsal fin

Danio annulosus Kullander, Rahman, Norén & Mollah 2015    ringed, referring to color pattern on sides, which resembles a series of dark rings

Danio assamila Kullander 2015   combination of Assam, area of India where it occurs, and ending of dangila, i.e., the Danio dangila of Assam   

Danio catenatus Kullander 2015    chained, referring to chain-like color pattern on sides

Danio choprae Hora 1928    in honor of Dr. B. N. Chopra, who collected type [Chopra was male, therefore Hora’s feminine ending was technically in error, which he acknowledged in a later publication; often seen as choprai but original spelling is acceptable since male names ending in “a” have historically been given the –ae termination]

Danio  concatenatus Kullander 2015    con-, with; catenatus, chained, i.e., linked together, referring to chain-like color pattern on sides

Danio dangila (Hamilton 1822)    local Bengali name for this species

Danio erythromicron (Annandale 1918)    erythros, red, presumably referring to scarlet color that suffuses entire surface of living specimens; micros, small, possibly referring to small size (up to 20 mm)

Danio feegradei Hora 1937    in honor of Lieut. E. S. Feegrade, malariologist, Public Health Department of Burma, who collected type

Danio flagrans Kullander 2012    flaming, blazing, burning or glowing, referring to red-to-orange color of living specimens; name also inspired by vernacular epithet Glowlight Danio applied to this species and D. choprae

Danio htamanthinus Kullander & Norén 2016    -inus, adjectival suffix: Htamanthi, village near type locality on the middle Chindwin River, Myanmar

Danio jaintianensis (Sen 2007)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Jaintia Hills district, Meghalaya, India, type locality     

Danio kerri Smith 1931    in honor of Arthur Francis George Kerr (1877-1942), physician and “botanist of the Siamese government,” who collected type

Danio kyathit Fang 1998    Burmese word for leopard (kyar, tiger; thit, different), referring to spotted color pattern

Danio margaritatus (Roberts 2007)    adorned with pearls, referring to pearl-like spots on sides

Danio meghalayensis Sen & Dey 1985    ensis, suffix denoting place: Meghalaya, India, only known area of occurrence

Danio nigrofasciatus (Day 1870)    nigro-, black; fasciatus, banded, referring to dark band along sides and second dotted narrow band below it

Danio pulcher Smith 1931    beautiful, referring to vivid coloration, including green, “chrome yellow,” orange, “Antwerp blue,” “sky-blue,” indigo, vermillion, and scarlet

Danio quagga Kullander, Liao & Fang 2009    from the zebra, Equus quagga, referring to 4-5 dark stripes along sides, similar to the zebra and the Zebrafish, D. rerio

Danio rerio (Hamilton 1822)    presumably a local Bengali name, as it was Hamilton’s practice to derive trivial names “from some of those used by the natives of India”

Danio roseus Fang & Kottelat 2000    rosy or pink, referring to color of sexually active males

Danio sysphigmatus Kullander 2015    Greek for chained, referring to chain-like color pattern on sides

Danio tinwini Kullander & Fang 2009    in honor of the authors’ friend, U Tin Win, “dedicated aquarist, knowledged collector, and exporter of aquarium fish from Myanmar”

Danionella Roberts 1986    diminutive of Danio, referring to minute adult size, 10-12 mm

Danionella dracula Britz, Conway & Rüber 2009    referring to long tooth-like fangs in jaws of males, inspired by Count Dracula in Bram Stoker’s novel

Danionella mirifica Britz 2003    wonderful or marvelous, alluding to highly unusual sexual dimorphism of its Weberian apparatus

Danionella priapus Britz 2009    Priapus, Greek god of fertility, referring to conical projection of genital papilla in males, which superficially resembles the penis of mammals

Danionella translucida Roberts 1986    translucent, referring to almost perfectly transparent coloration (except for eyes)

Devario Heckel 1843    tautonymous with Cyprinus devario (latinization of Debari, local Bengali name for this species)

Devario acrostomus (Fang & Kottelat 1999)    acros, at the end, or tip; stomus, mouth, referring to sharp pointed mouth

Devario acuticephala (Hora 1921)    acutus, sharp or pointed; cephalus, head, referring to “sharp and pointed head”

Devario aequipinnatus (McClelland 1839)    aequalitas, equal; pinna, fin, referring to dorsal and anal fins being of equal size

Devario affinis (Blyth 1860)    related, referring to close resemblance to Perilampus lineolatus (= Devario aequipinnatus)

Devario annandalei (Chaudhuri 1908)    in honor of zoologist-anthropologist Thomas Nelson Annandale (1876-1924), Director, Indian Museum (Calcutta), who collected type

Devario anomalus Conway, Mayden & Tang 2009    uneven or irregular, referring to irregular vertical bars on anterior half body

Devario apogon (Chu 1981)    a-, without; pogon, beard, referring to absence of barbels

Devario apopyris (Fang & Kottelat 1999)    Greek for a small fish, being one of the small-barred species of Danio (genus in which it was described)

Devario assamensis (Barman 1984)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Assam, India, where it is endemic

Devario browni (Regan 1907)    in honor of geologist J. Coggin Brown (1884-1962), who collected type

Devario chrysotaeniatus (Chu 1981)    chrysos, gold; taeniatus, banded, referring to golden stripes or streaks on sides

Devario deruptotalea Ramananda & Vishwanath 2014    deruptus, broken; talea, bars, referring to broken bars of color on sides

Devario devario (Hamilton 1822)    latinization of Debari, local Bengali name for this species

Devario fangae Kullander 2017    in honor of the late Fang Fang (1962-2010, Kullander’s wife), the “proper discoverer” of this species, who singled it out as new, “recognizing her deep personal interest in the freshwater fishes of Myanmar,” where it occurs

Devario fangfangae (Kottelat 2000)    in honor of Fang Fang (1962-2010), author of several papers on the systematics of Danio, in appreciation of her help

Devario fraseri (Hora 1935)    in honor of herpetologist A. G. Fraser for obtaining specimens of this species and that of Rasbora labiosa

Devario gibber (Kottelat 2000)    humpbacked, referring to small hump on nape

Devario horai (Barman 1983)    in honor of the late Sunder Lal Hora (1896-1955), “eminent” ichthyologist and former Director of the Zoological Survey of India

Devario interruptus (Day 1870)    interrupted, referring to how lateral line ends opposite base of ventral fin

Devario kakhienensis (Anderson 1879)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Kakhyen Hills, western Yunnan border between China and Myanmar, type locality

Devario kysonensis (Nguyen, Nguyen & Mua 2010)    –ensis, suffix denoting place: Ky Son district, Nghe An Province, Viêt Nam, where it is endemic

Devario laoensis (Pellegrin & Fang 1940)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Laos, type locality (also occurs in Thailand)

Devario leptos (Fang & Kottelat 1999)    slender or thin, referring to slender body shape

Devario malabaricus (Jerdon 1849)    icus, belonging to: Malabar (i.e., southern India), type locality (also occurs in Sri Lanka and has been introduced elsewhere)

Devario manipurensis (Barman 1987)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Manipur, India, where it is endemic

Devario myitkyinae Kullander 2017    of Myitkyina, northern Myanwar, type locality, where it appears to be the only representative of the genus

Devario naganensis (Chaudhuri 1912)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Naga Hills, Manipur, India, type locality

Devario neilgherriensis (Day 1867)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Neilgherry Hills, India, type locality

Devario ostreographus (McClelland 1839)    ostrinus, purple; graphos, mark, referring to distinct purple stripes on sides

Devario pathirana (Kottelat & Pethiyagoda 1990)    named for aquarium-fish breeder and exporter Ananda Pathirana, for calling the authors’ attention to this fish

Devario quangbinhensis (Nguyen, Le & Nguyen 1999)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Quang Bình Province, Viêt Nam, only known area of occurrence

Devario regina (Fowler 1934)    queen, dedicated to Her Majesty Rambaibarni (1904-1984), Queen of Siam

Devario salmonatus (Kottelat 2000)    salmon-like, “with the colour of salmon flesh” (belly, pelvic, anal and caudal fins of breeding males are described as “salmon-orange”)

Devario sondhii (Hora & Mukerji 1934)    in honor of V. P. Sondhi, Geological Survey of India, who collected type

Devario spinosus (Day 1870)    thorny, referring to sharp spine pointing forwards above anterior superior margin of orbit, and a broader and less sharp spine before center of anterior orbital margin

Devario strigillifer (Myers 1924)    strigilla, full of striga, a row of grain or hay, or a bristle, allusion not explained nor evident

Devario xyrops Fang & Kullander 2009     xyron, razor; ops, eye, referring to sharp, exposed bony margin of supraorbital and wide infraorbital process

Engraulicypris Günther 1894    engraulis, anchovy, referring to anchovy-like shape and coloration (and presumably its shoaling and zooplanktivory as well); cypris, a small carp, a common suffix for cyprinid genera

Engraulicypris bredoi Poll 1945    in honor of Belgian explorer Hans J. Brédo (1903-1991), who collected type

Engraulicypris brevianalis (Boulenger 1908)    brevis, short; analis, anus or anal fin, referring to smaller number of anal-fin rays (14 instead of 18-20) among known Neobola (genus in which it was described) at the time

Engraulicypris gariepinus Barnard 1943    –inus, belonging to: Gariep River (meaning “Great Water,” now known as Orange River), Namibia, type locality (also occurs in South Africa) 

Engraulicypris howesi Riddin, Bills & Villet 2016    in honor of Gordon J. Howes (1938-2013), Natural History Museum (London), whose studies of the osteology of the Danioninae laid the foundations of their modern classification (Howes also described Mesobola, now considered a junior synonym of Engraulicypris)

Engraulicypris ngalala Riddin, Villet & Bills 2016    name of any, small, compressed, silvery fish (including Engraulicypris and two African [Alestiidae] tetras, Brycinus and Hemigrammopetersius) in the Cyao language spoken in the Niassa region of northern, where this species occurs

Engraulicypris sardella (Günther 1868)    diminutive of sardine, referring to anchovy-like shape and coloration (and presumably its shoaling and zooplanktivory as well)

Engraulicypris spinifer Bailey & Matthes 1971    spina, thorn; fero, to bear, referring to numerous minute spiny tubercles on both sexes, appearing chiefly on head and sometimes along upper side of proximal part of first pectoral ray

Esomus Swainson 1839    e-, out of or from; soma, body, etymology not explained and allusion not evident, perhaps referring to long maxillary barbels, which reach ventral fin and thus can be described as extending out from the body

Esomus ahli Hora & Mukerji 1928    in honor of ichthyologist-herpetologist Ernst Ahl (1898-1945), who identified this cyprinid as E. malabaricus in 1923

Esomus altus (Blyth 1860)    altus, high, presumably referring to deeper body compared to E. danricus

Esomus barbatus (Jerdon 1849)    bearded, referring to long maxillary barbels, reaching to ventral fin

Esomus caudiocellatus Ahl 1924    cauda-, tail; ocellatus, eye spot, referring to black ocellus with golden border at base of caudal fin

Esomus danrica (Hamilton 1822)    local Bengali name for this species

Esomus longimanus (Lunel 1881)    longus, long; manus, hand, referring to long pectoral fin ray, which sometimes reaches to anal fin

Esomus malabaricus Day 1867    icus, belonging to: Malabar (i.e., southern India), referring to type locality in Trichoor, Kerala

Esomus malayensis (Matte & Reichelt 1908)     ensis, suffix denoting place: either the Malay Peninsula or Archipelago (location given as Hinterindien, or Indo-China) [senior secondary homonym of Esomus malayensis Ahl 1924, which appears to be a distinct species]

Esomus manipurensis Tilak & Jain 1990    ensis, suffix denoting place: Manipur, India, where it is endemic

Esomus metallicus Ahl 1923    metallic, presumably referring to silvery coloration and/or narrow, shiny, but barely visible, silver stripe on side

Esomus thermoicos (Valenciennes 1842)    thermal, referring to hot spring type locality in Cania, Sri Lanka, at 40˚C

Fangfangia Britz, Kottelat & Tan 2012    ia, belonging to: the late Fang Fang (1962-2010), “a passionate and productive cypriniform researcher, who left us too early,” for her contribution to danionine taxonomy and phylogeny

Fangfangia spinicleithralis Britz, Kottelat & Tan 2012    spina, thorn; cleithralis, belonging to the cleithrum (main element of dermal shoulder girdle), referring to unique pointed anterior and posterior spines

Horadandia Deraniyagala 1943    hora dandia, Sinhalese for “false Rasbora,” referring to “kinship” to rasborines (based on mouth shape and absence of lateral line)

Horadandia atukorali Deraniyagala 1943    in honor of Vicky Atukorale (a male), who first drew Deraniyagala’s attention to this fish

Horadandia brittani Remi Devi & Menon 1992    in honor of ichthyologist Martin R. Brittan (d. 2008), California State University, who provided specimens, biometric data and literature, and for critically reviewing the authors’ manuscript

Inlecypris Howes 1980    Inle, referring to Inlé Lake basin, South Shan States, Myanmar, type locality of I. auropurpureus, type species

Inlecypris auropurpureus (Annandale 1918)    auro, gold; purpureus, purple, referring to dorsal coloration: “suffused with deep purple, the vertical bars and caudal stripe are bright ultramarine blue surrounded with a halo of gold”

Inlecypris jayarami (Barman 1985)    in honor of K. C. Jayaram, Deputy Director, Zoological Survey of India, and “one of the prominent workers of the fishes of India of the present decade”

Inlecypris maetaengensis (Fang 1997)    –ensis, suffix denoting place: Nam Mae Taeng River, Thailand, type locality

Inlecypris shanensis (Hora 1928)    –ensis, suffix denoting place: northern Shan States, Myanmar, type locality

Kottelatia Liao, Kullander & Fang 2010    ia, pertaining to: Swiss ichthyologist Maurice Kottelat (b. 1957), author of numerous species and several genera of rasborins

Kottelatia brittani (Axelrod 1976)    in honor of Martin R. Brittan (d. 2008), monographer and reviser of Rasbora (genus in which it was described) and “close personal friend”

Laubuka Bleeker 1859    presumably tautonymous with Cyprinus laubuca (no species mentioned), latinization of Layubuka, local Bengali name for that species [often spelled Laubuca dating to Bleeker 1860, but this spelling has priority]

Laubuka brahmaputraensis Kulabtong, Suksri & Nonpayom 2012    ensis, suffix denoting place: Brahmaputra River, Bangladesh, where it is endemic              

Laubuka caeruleostigmata Smith 1931    caeruleus, blue; stigmatus, marked, referring to blue spot on top of head behind eyes

Laubuka dadiburjori Menon 1952    in honor of Bombay aquarist Sam J. Dadiburjor, who collected, bred and “brought this interesting fish to the notice of science”

Laubuka fasciata (Silas 1958)    banded, referring to broad, dark lateral stripe running from just behind eye to just in front of caudal fin base

Laubuka insularis Pethiyagoda, Kottelat, Silva, Maduwage & Meegaskumbura 2008    of islands, referring to distribution on the island of Sri Lanka

Laubuka lankensis (Deraniyagala 1960)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Sri Lanka, where it is endemic

Laubuka latens Knight 2015    hidden, i.e., its identity being hidden, referring to its having been overlooked in earlier ichthyofaunal surveys due to its having been confused with L. laubuca

Laubuka laubuca (Hamilton 1822)    latinization of Layubuka, local Bengali name for this species

Laubuka ruhuna Pethiyagoda, Kottelat, Silva, Maduwage & Meegaskumbura 2008    Sinhalese name for southern Sri Lanka, where it occurs

Laubuka siamensis Fowler 1939    –ensis, suffix denoting place: Siam (Thailand), where it is endemic

Laubuka trevori Knight 2015    in honor of Trevor Menezes (1957–2010), “for his enthusiasm and support to aquarium-fish hobbyists in exploring the Cauvery and Tunga River systems [of southern India]; he died during one such expedition”

Laubuka varuna Pethiyagoda, Kottelat, Silva, Maduwage & Meegaskumbura 2008    Sinhalese for western, referring to its being restricted to west-flowing Kelani and Kalu drainages of Sri Lanka

Leptocypris Boulenger 1900    leptos, thin or slender, presumably referring to “elongate, slightly compressed” body (translation); cypris, a small carp, a common suffix for cyprinid genera

Leptocypris crossensis Howes & Teugels 1989    ensis, suffix denoting place: Cross River system, Guinea, type locality

Leptocypris guineensis (Daget 1962)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Guinea, where it is endemic

Leptocypris konkoureensis Howes & Teugels 1989    ensis, suffix denoting place: Konkouré River, Badi, Guinea, type locality

Leptocypris lujae (Boulenger 1909)    in honor of botanist and entomologist Edouard Luja (1875-1953), resident of Kasai, Zaire (now Democratic Republic of the Congo, type locality), who collected type

Leptocypris modestus Boulenger 1900    unassuming, allusion not explained, probably referring to generic anchovy-like shape and silvery coloration

Leptocypris niloticus (Joannis 1835)    icus, belonging to: Nile River at Thebes, Egypt, type locality

Leptocypris taiaensis Howes & Teugels 1989    ensis, suffix denoting place: Taia (or Taye) River at Njala, Sierra Leone, type locality

Leptocypris weeksii (Boulenger 1899)    in honor of Rev. J. H. Weeks, who collected type at his mission station in Monsembe, upper Congo River, Zaire (now Democratic Republic of the Congo)

Leptocypris weynsii (Boulenger 1899)    in honor of Belgian explorer Auguste F. G. Weyns (1854-1944), who collected type

Luciosoma Bleeker 1855    lucius, pike; soma, body, referring to elongate, pike-like shape

Luciosoma bleekeri Steindachner 1878    in honor of Dutch medical doctor and ichthyologist Pieter Bleeker (1819-1878), who proposed this genus in 1855

Luciosoma pellegrinii Popta 1905    patronym not identified but clearly in honor of Jacques Pellegrin (1873-1944), who described many Southeast Asian freshwater fishes

Luciosoma setigerum (Valenciennes 1842)    having setae (hair-like structures), probably referring to long, filamentous outer ray of ventral fins

Luciosoma spilopleura Bleeker 1855    spilos, spot; pleuro-, side, referring to row of rounded dark spots along side of body

Luciosoma trinema (Bleeker 1852)    tri-, three; nema-, thread, referring to thread-like extensions on anal and pelvic fins

Malayochela Bănărescu 1968    proposed as a subgenus of Chela, “restricted to countries inhabited by people speaking languages of the Malayan family”

Malayochela maassi (Weber & de Beaufort 1912)    in honor of German anthropologist Alfred Maass (1889-1936), who led an expedition to Sumatra, during which type was collected

Microdevario Fang, Norén, Liao, Källersjö & Kullander 2009    micro-, small, referring to their miniature size; Devario, referring to their relationship with that genus

Microdevario gatesi (Herre 1939)    in honor of Gordon E. Gates, “distinguished” lumbricologist of Judson College (Rangoon), without whose aid Herre’s visit to Rangoon “would have been of little avail”

Microdevario kubotai (Kottelat & Witte 1999)    in honor of aquarium fish exporter Katsuma Kubota, for “his help in conducting several projects, assistance in the field, and the gift of numerous specimens”

Microdevario microphthalma (Jiang, Chen & Yang 2008)    micro-, small; opthalmos, eye, referring to smaller eyes compared to congeners and Microrasbora rubescens

Microdevario nanus (Kottelat & Witte 1999)    nanus, dwarf, referring to small size, up to 15.2 mm SL

Microrasbora Annandale 1918    micro-, small, being diminutive species closely allied to Rasbora

Microrasbora rubescens Annandale 1918    reddish, referring to orange-scarlet color of sides, ventral surface of head, and caudal, anal and sometimes dorsal fins of both sexes

Nematabramis Boulenger 1894    nemato-, thread, referring to long maxillary barbel; abramis, probably referring to similar body shape to the Old World leuciscin Abramis brama

Nematabramis alestes (Seale & Bean 1907)    Greek for miller or grinder, an apparent misnomer since sharp, pointed pharyngeal teeth are described as “without evident grinding surface” (perhaps authors translated name as a-, without; lestes, miller or grinder)

Nematabramis borneensis Inger & Chin 1962    ensis, suffix denoting place: Borneo, described as a Bornean subspecies of N. everetti

Nematabramis everetti Boulenger 1894    patronym not identified but clearly in honor of Alfred Hart Everett (1848-1898), naturalist, British civil servant and administrator in Borneo, who collected type

Nematabramis steindachnerii Popta 1905    patronym not identified but clearly in honor of Austrian ichthyologist Franz Steindachner (1834-1919)

Neobola Vinciguerra 1895    neo-, being a new genus closely allied to Bola (=Raiamas)

Neobola bottegoi Vinciguerra 1895    in honor of Italian Army officer Vittorio Bottego (1860-1897), who led expedition to Somalia (1895-1897), during which type was collected [Vinciguerra later wished to drop the terminal “o” in Bottego’s name to adhere to a strict interpretation of the Latin genitive, but the original spelling stands]

Neobola fluviatilis (Whitehead 1962)    of a river, referring to occurrence over sandy beaches in Athi River, Kenya

Neobola moeruensis (Boulenger 1915)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Lake Moero (or Mweru), Democratic Republic of the Congo, type locality

Neobola stellae (Worthington 1932)    in honor of Worthington’s wife Stella, a member of the expedition that collected type, for “greatly” assisting with her husband’s fish research

Opsaridium Peters 1854    opsar-, presumably referring to resemblance and/or affinity of O. zambezense to Opsarius; –idium, a diminutive

Opsaridium boweni (Fowler 1930)    in honor of ornithologist Wilfrid Wedgwood Bowen (1899-1987), who collected type and several others obtained by the Gray African Expedition

Opsaridium christyi (Boulenger 1920)    in honor of Cuthbert Christy (1863-1932), explorer and naturalist, who collected type

Opsaridium engrauloides (Nichols 1923)    oides, having the form of: engraulis, anchovy, described as “more or less intermediate” between Barilius (original genus) and Engraulicypris

Opsaridium leleupi (Matthes 1965)    in honor of entomologist Narcisse Leleup (1912-2001), Institut pour la Recherche Scientifique en Afrique Centrale, who collected type

Opsaridium loveridgii (Norman 1922)    in honor of herpetologist Arthur Loveridge (1891-1980), who presented type to the British Museum (Natural History)

Opsaridium maculicauda (Pellegrin 1926)    maculosus, spot; cauda, tail, referring to small oval black spot at end of caudal peduncle

Opsaridium microcephalum (Günther 1864)    micro-, small; cephalus, head, referring to small head, contained 5½ times in SL

Opsaridium microlepis (Günther 1864)    micro-, small; lepis, scale, referring to smaller (and more numerous) scales compared to O. microcephalum

Opsaridium peringueyi (Gilchrist & Thompson 1913)    patronym not identified but clearly in honor of entomologist Louis Peringuey (1855-1924), director of the South African Museum, in whose publication this species was described

Opsaridium splendens Taverne & De Vos 1997    splendid, presumably referring to its coloration: 10-13 dark transverse bars on a silvery body

Opsaridium tweddleorum Skelton 1996    orum, commemorative suffix, plural: in honor of Denis and Sharon Tweddle, for their contributions (e.g., study specimens, color slides) to the study of Malawi fishes

Opsaridium ubangiense (Pellegrin 1901)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Ubangi River, Central African Republic, type locality

Opsaridium zambezense (Peters 1852)    ensis, suffix denoting place: lower Zambezi River system, Mozambique, type locality

Opsarius McClelland 1838    according to McClelland, from a Greek word meaning “small fish”

Opsarius barna (Hamilton 1822)    local Bengali name for this species

Opsarius barnoides (Vinciguerra 1890)    oides, having the form of: O. barna, which Vinciguerra had initially confused with this species

Opsarius bernatziki (Koumans 1937)    in honor of anthropologist and photographer Hugo Bernatzik (1897-1953), who collected type

Opsarius caudiocellatus (Chu 1984)    caudi-, tail; ocellatus, spotted, referring to black round spot at base of caudal fin    

Opsarius chatricensis (Selim & Vishwanath 2002)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Chatrickong River, Ukhrul District, Manipur, India, type locality

Opsarius cocsa (Hamilton 1822)    latinization of Khoksa, local Bengali name for this species

Opsarius dogarsinghi (Hora 1921)    in honor of Sardar Dogar Singh, State Overseer, Manipur, India, who gave Hora “material assistance” in the collection of specimens (including type of this one), and helped arrange survey tours

Opsarius infrafasciatus (Fowler 1934)    infra-, below; fasciatus, banded, referring to dark transverse bars that extend below lateral line

Opsarius koratensis (Smith 1931)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Korat District, eastern Thailand, type locality

Opsarius ngawa (Vishwanath & Manojkumar 2002)    Nga-wa, local name in Manipur, India (Nga = fish; wa = swift movement of shoal)

Opsarius ornatus (Sauvage 1883)    decorated, presumably referring to 12 steel-blue transverse bands across silvery body

Opsarius pulchellus (Smith 1931)    diminutive of pulcher, beautiful, referring to vivid coloration (e.g., red-edged dorsal fin, orange belly, 10 blackish vertically elongate spots, and orange anal, ventral and pectoral fins)

Opsarius signicaudus (Tejavej 2012)    signum, flag or sign; cauda, tail, referring to large, elongated blotch at caudal-fin base

Opsarius tileo (Hamilton 1822)    local Bengali name (also spelled tilei) for this species

Paedocypris Kottelat, Britz, Tan & Witte 2006    paideios, children, being a paedomorphic (i.e., neotenic or “larval”) fish; cypris, a small carp

Paedocypris carbunculus Britz & Kottelat 2008    ruby (gemstone), referring to reddish coloration in life

Paedocypris micromegethes Kottelat, Britz, Tan & Witte 2006    Greek for small in size, up to 11.6 mm SL

Paedocypris progenetica Kottelat, Britz, Tan & Witte 2006    progenetic, referring to how members of genus accelerate sexual maturation relative to rest of development, leading to dwarfed adults with larval features

Pectenocypris Kottelat 1982    pecten, comb, referring to numerous gill rakers; cypris, a small carp, a common suffix for cyprinid genera

Pectenocypris balaena Roberts 1989    whale, referring to numerous Baleen Whale-like gill rakers

Pectenocypris korthausae Kottelat 1982    in honor of German aquarist Edith Korthaus, who helped collect type

Pectenocypris micromysticetus Tan & Kottelat 2009    micro-, small; mystus, moustache; cetus, whale, referring to numerous gill rakers, which resemble the baleen plates of mysticete whales

Pectenocypris nigra Wibowo, Ahnelt & Kertamihardja 2016    black, referring to blackish coloration in life

Raiamas Jordan 1919    latinization of Rajah mas, local name for R. bola among anglers of India

Raiamas ansorgii (Boulenger 1910)    in honor of explorer William John Ansorge (1850-1913), who collected type

Raiamas batesii (Boulenger 1914)    in honor of George Latimer Bates (1863-1940), Cameroon farmer and ornithologist, who collected specimens for the Natural History Museum (London), including type of this species

Raiamas bola (Hamilton 1822)    variant of Bhola, local Bengali vernacular for this species

Raiamas buchholzi (Peters 1876)    in honor of physician-naturalist Reinhold Buchholz (1837-1876), its discoverer

Raiamas guttatus (Day 1870)    spotted, referring to two rows of blue spots along sides

Raiamas kheeli Stiassny, Schelly & Schliewen 2006    in honor of attorney and labor mediator Theodore W. Kheel (1914-2010), for his “enduring support for nature conservation and sustainable development around the globe” [in 1991, Kheel founded the Nurture Nature Foundation to help resolve the conflict between environmental protection and economic development]

Raiamas levequei Howes & Teugels 1989    in honor of ichthyologist Christian Lévêque, who collected type

Raiamas longirostris (Boulenger 1902)    longus, long; rostris, snout, referring to acutely pointed snout, projecting slightly beyond lower jaw, more than 1/3 length of head

Raiamas moorii (Boulenger 1900)    in honor of its discoverer, John Edmund Sharrock Moore (1870-1947), cytologist, zoologist and Tanganyika expedition leader

Raiamas nigeriensis (Daget 1959)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Upper Niger River near Bamako, Mail, type locality

Raiamas salmolucius (Nichols & Griscom 1917)    salmo-, salmon, allusion not explained, possibly referring to parr-like markings on sides; lucius, pike, allusion not explained, possibly referring to pike-like length of head

Raiamas scarciensis Howes & Teugels 1989    ensis, suffix denoting place: Little Scarcies River, Sierra Leone, type locality

Raiamas senegalensis (Steindachner 1870)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Dagana, Senegal, type locality

Raiamas shariensis (Fowler 1949)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Shari River system, Chad, type locality and only known area of occurrence

Raiamas steindachneri (Pellegrin 1908)    in honor of Franz Steindachner (1834-1919), director of the Imperial Natural History Museum of Vienna (now Naturhistorisches Museum Wien, where Pellegrin spent a “charming” holiday), for whom “science is indebted for the knowledge of so many interesting kinds of fishes, particularly from Senegal” (translation)

Rasbora Bleeker 1859    presumably tautonymous with Cyprinus rasbora (although Bleeker designated Leuciscus cephalotaenia as type of genus)

Rasbora amplistriga Kottelat 2000    amplus, broad or wide; striga, stripe, referring to dark lateral stripe from upper extremity of gill opening to caudal-fin base

Rasbora api Lumbantobing 2010    word for fire in Bahasa, Indonesia, referring to vermilion coloration of dorsal and caudal fins and orange-yellowish markings on living specimens, “a pigmentation pattern appearing like fire”

Rasbora aprotaenia Hubbs & Brittan 1954    etymology not explained, presumably a-, without; pro-, forward; taenia, band, referring to absence of lateral band in front of dorsal fin origin

Rasbora argyrotaenia (Bleeker 1849)    arguros, silver; taenia, banded, referring to silvery streak or band along sides, more distinct in young specimens than in old ones

Rasbora armitagei Silva, Maduwage & Pethiyagoda 2010    in honor of aquarist David Armitage, for his efforts to “explore, conserve, breed and build awareness” of tropical freshwater fishes, incuding those of Sri Lanka

Rasbora arundinata Lumbantobing 2014    reed-like, referring to black midlateral stripe, which resembles the leaf of a reed

Rasbora ataenia Plamoottil 2016    a-, without; taenia, band or ribbon, referring to absence of a lateral color stripe, unlike the related R. dandia  

Rasbora atranus Kottelat & Tan 2011    ater, black, anus, anal, referring to black mark along anterior part of base of anal fin

Rasbora atridorsalis Kottelat & Chu 1988    ater, black or dark; dorsalis, dorsal, referring to black spot at tip of dorsal fin

Rasbora aurotaenia Tirant 1885    aurum, gold; taenia, band, referring to golden-yellow line or stripe across upper half of body

Rasbora baliensis Hubbs & Brittan 1954    ensis, suffix denoting place: Lake Bratan, Bali, where it is endemic

Rasbora bankanensis (Bleeker 1853)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Bangka (or Banka), Indonesia, type locality (also occurs on Malay Peninsula)

Rasbora bindumatoga Lumbantobing 2014    derived from Bindu Matoga in the two native languages of northern Sumatra, Mandailing and Toba, where this species occurs; the term is commonly used as the name of a traditional ornament with a rectangle outline, here referring to rectangular shape of black subdorsal blotch

Rasbora borapetensis Smith 1934    ensis, suffix denoting place: Bung Borapet, Nakorn-Sawan, central Thailand, type locality

Rasbora borneensis Bleeker 1860    ensis, suffix denoting place: Borneo, where it is endemic

Rasbora bunguranensis Brittan 1951    ensis, suffix denoting place: Bunguran Island, between Borneo and Malaya, where it is endemic

Rasbora calliura Boulenger 1894    calli-, beautiful; oura, tail, probably referring to “much elongate” caudal lobes, edged in black

Rasbora caudimaculata Volz 1903    caudi-, tail; maculata, spotted, referring to black tips of caudal fin lobes

Rasbora caverii (Jerdon 1849)    of the Kaveri (also spelled Cavery) River, India, type locality (also occurs in Sri Lanka)

Rasbora cephalotaenia (Bleeker 1852)    cephalus, head; taenia, band, referring to black lateral band that begins at point of snout (and continues to end of caudal fin)

Rasbora chrysotaenia Ahl 1937    chrysos, gold; taenia, band, referring to metallic green-gold to red-gold stripe from upper lip, through eye, over opercle, down side to caudal fin base

Rasbora cryptica Kottelat & Tan 2012    secret, referring to its having been mistaken for R. volzii

Rasbora dandia (Valenciennes 1844)    etymology not explained, probably latinization of dandiya, Sri Lankan name for members of the genus Rasbora

Rasbora daniconius (Hamilton 1822)    latinization of Danikoni, local Bengali vernacular for this species

Rasbora dies Kottelat 2008    Latin for a day, allusion not explained nor evident

Rasbora dorsinotata Kottelat 1988    dorsalis, dorsal; notatus, marked or stained, referring to black blotch at tip of dorsal fin

Rasbora dusonensis (Bleeker 1850)    ensis, suffix denoting place: Duson (or Banjer River), Borneo, type locality (also occurs in Malay Peninsula, Sumatra, Laos and Thailand)

Rasbora einthovenii (Bleeker 1851)    in honor of Jacob Einthoven, Dutch East Indian Army surgeon and public health civil servant, who collected or provided type

Rasbora elegans Volz 1903    fine or select, allusion not specified, possibly referring to elegant coloration, particularly two dark patches on sides

Rasbora ennealepis Roberts 1989    ennea, nine; lepis, scale, referring to characteristic number of predorsal scales

Rasbora everetti Boulenger 1895    in honor of Alfred Hart Everett (1848-1898), British civil servant and administrator, naturalist and zoological collector, who collected type

Rasbora gerlachi Ahl 1928    in honor of German aquarist Fritz Gerlach, who apparently received live specimens from a collector in Africa and then provided one or more of them (or captive-bred specimens) to Ahl

Rasbora haru Lumbantobing 2014    derived from the name of an old kingdom in the area currently known as Deli (Sumatra), where the species occurs   

Rasbora hobelmani Kottelat 1984    in honor of Paul Hobelman, for his “hospitality, friendship, help and enduring [Kottelat] for several weeks of fieldwork” in Thailand

Rasbora hosii Boulenger 1895    in honor of Charles Hose (1863-1929), British colonial administrator, zoologist and ethnologist, who collected type

Rasbora hubbsi Brittan 1954    in honor of Carl L. Hubbs (1894-1979), Scripps Institution of Oceanography, “for making available his fine library and for sharing his unequaled knowledge of cyprinid fishes”

Rasbora jacobsoni Weber & de Beaufort 1916    in honor of entomologist Edward Jacobson, who collected type

Rasbora johannae Siebert & Guiry 1996    in memory of British politician Joan Vickers (1907-1994), “a long-time advocate of Indonesian culture”

Rasbora kalbarensis Kottelat 1991    ensis, suffix denoting place: Kal. Bar., abbreviation for Kalimantan Barat, where it appears to be endemic

Rasbora kalochroma (Bleeker 1851)    kallos, beauty; chroma, color, referring to rosy-red coloration on upper half of body and deep red fins

Rasbora kluetensis Lumbantobing 2010    ensis, suffix denoting place: Kluet River, Sumatra, Indonesia, where it is endemic

Rasbora kobonensis Chaudhuri 1913    ensis, suffix denoting place: Kobo, Abor Hills, Assam, India, type locality

Rasbora kottelati Lim 1995    in honor of Swiss ichthyologist Maurice Kottelat (b. 1957), for “his help and outstanding contributions to Southeast Asian ichthyology”

Rasbora labiosa Mukerji 1935    large-lipped, referring to “peculiar” lower lip, “more fleshy and flabby” than upper lip, projecting beyond lower jaw and “partly deflected upwards over the upper lip”

Rasbora lacrimula Hadiaty & Kottelat 2009    diminutive of lacrima, tear, i.e., a little tear, referring to teardrop shape of blotch on caudal peduncle

Rasbora lateristriata (Bleeker 1854)    lateralis, of the side; striatus, striped, referring to dark lateral stripe extending from opercle to caudal base

Rasbora laticlavia Siebert & Richardson 1997    latus, wide; clavius, purple striped, referring to very broad, diffuse swath of melanophores that contribute to anterior part of lateral stripe

Rasbora leptosoma (Bleeker 1855)    leptos, thin; soma, body, referring to thin, elongate body shape

Rasbora maninjau Lumbantobing 2014    named for Lake Maninjau, a crater lake in central western Sumatra, where it appears to be endemic

Rasbora meinkeni de Beaufort 1931    in honor of aquarist-ichthyologist Herrmann Meinken (1896-1976), who gave de Beaufort a breeding pair of this species on which description is based

Rasbora myersi Brittan 1954    in honor of Stanford University ichthyologist George S. Myers (1905-1985), Brittan’s former major professor, for “valuable” assistance and for making available the extensive collections of Dr. A. W. Herre and many bibliographic materials, “many of them extremely rare”

Rasbora naggsi Silva, Maduwage & Pethiyagoda 2010    in honor of malacologist Fred Naggs (Natural History Museum, London), for his support of biodiversity exploration and research in Sri Lanka

Rasbora nematotaenia Hubbs & Brittan 1954    nematos, thread; taenia, band, allusion unclear, possibly referring to thin, pale or weakly developed lateral band

Rasbora nodulosa Lumbantobing 2010    with nodules, referring to nodule-like shape of cephalic tubercles on males

Rasbora notura Kottelat 2005    nota, mark; oura, tail, referring to large diamond-shaped blotch at end of caudal peduncle and base of caudal fin

Rasbora ornata Vishwanath & Laisram 2005    beautiful, referring to coloration (dusky fins, creamish body with dark blue longitudinal stripe extending from snout to end of median caudal rays, lateral and dorsal scales edged by a row of spots on each scale)

Rasbora patrickyapi Tan 2009    in honor of Patrick Yap Boon Hiang, freshwater fish enthusiast and exporter and long-time supporter of the Raffles Museum of Biodiversity Research, who generously donated much fish material to Tan’s research

Rasbora paucisqualis Ahl 1935    paucus, few; squalis, presumably a misprint for squamis, scale, referring to large and, hence, fewer, scales compared to most other rasboras

Rasbora paviana Tirant 1885    ana, belonging to: Auguste Jean-Marie Pavie (1847-1925), French colonial civil servant and diplomat, Tirant’s friend and “tireless explorer of the southern and western provinces of Cambodia” (translation)

Rasbora philippina Günther 1880    Filipino, referring to endemic occurrence in the Philippines

Rasbora rasbora (Hamilton 1822)    local Bengali vernacular for this species

Rasbora reticulata Weber & de Beaufort 1915    reticulated, referring to how three longitudinal series of lateral scales, with corresponding blackish patches, connect to form a reticulate pattern

Rasbora rheophila Kottelat 2012    rheos, stream; philos, loving, referring to fast-flowing, hillstream habitat                  

Rasbora rubrodorsalis Donoso-Büchner & Schmidt 1997    rubro-, scarlet; dorsalis, dorsal, referring to bright red blotch on dorsal fin

Rasbora rutteni Weber & de Beaufort 1916    in honor of Dutch geologist Louis Martin Robert Rutten (1884-1946), who collected type

Rasbora sarawakensis Brittan 1951    ensis, suffix denoting place: Sarawak state, Borneo, East Malaysia, type locality

Rasbora semilineata Weber & de Beaufort 1916    semi-, half; lineata, lined, presumably referring to black line on posterior half of body

Rasbora septentrionalis Kottelat 2000    northern, being one of the most northern-ranging species of Rasbora

Rasbora spilotaenia Hubbs & Brittan 1954    spilos, mark or spot; taenia, band, referring to lateral stripe connected by mid-lateral and peduncular blotches

Rasbora steineri Nichols & Pope 1927    in honor of Rev. J. F. Steiner, American Presbyterian Mission of Hainan, for his interest in the authors’ work

Rasbora subtilis Roberts 1989    thin, fine or slender, referring to slender form and delicate coloration

Rasbora sumatrana (Bleeker 1852)    ana, belonging to: Sumatra, where it is endemic

Rasbora tawarensis Weber & de Beaufort 1916    ensis, suffix denoting place: Lake Tawar, Sumatra, Indonesia, type locality

Rasbora taytayensis Herre 1924    ensis, suffix denoting place: Taytay, Palawan, Philippines, near type locality

Rasbora tobana Ahl 1934    ana, belonging to: Toba Lake, Sumatra, Indonesia, type locality

Rasbora tornieri Ahl 1922    patronym not identified but probably in honor of Ahl’s Berlin colleague, herpetologist and paleontologist Gustav Tornier (1858-1938)

Rasbora trifasciata Popta 1905    tri-, three; fasciata, banded, allusion uncertain, possibly referring to combination of two brown longitudinal bands on sides and one longitudinal line (the axial streak)

Rasbora trilineata Steindachner 1870    tri-, three; lineata, line, referring to three lines or stripes: (1) a short, blackish line on sides along base of anal fin; (2) narrow, dark, mid-lateral stripe on sides; (3) black stripe along middle of back

Rasbora truncata Lumbantobing 2010    referring to truncated lateral line system, i.e., an incomplete lateral line and a truncated cephalic line

Rasbora tubbi Brittan 1954    in honor of J. Allan Tubb, Director of Fisheries, Crown Colony of North Borneo, who collected type

Rasbora tuberculata Kottelat 1995    tuberculate, being the only known species of Rasbora with well-developed tubercles (on back in front of dorsal fin, caudal peduncle, dorsal fin, and upper lobe of caudal fin)

Rasbora urophthalma Ahl 1922    oura, tail; ophthalmus, eye, referring to eye-like pre-caudal spot [presence of barbels suggest it belongs to Puntius or a related genus, or to an African lineage; retained in Rasbora for now]

Rasbora vaillantii Popta 1905    patronym not identified but probably in honor of Léon Vaillant (1834-1914), zoologist, Muséum national d’Histoire naturelle (Paris)

Rasbora vietnamensis Vasil’eva & Vasil’ev 2013    ensis, suffix denoting place: Viêt Nam, where it is endemic to Phu Quoc Island, Gulf of Thailand   

Rasbora volzii Popta 1905    patronym not identified but clearly in honor of Walter Volz, Natural History Museum of Bern, who had published three papers on Sumatran fishes in 1903 and 1904

Rasbora vulcanus Tan 1999    Vulcanus, god of fire, referring to fiery red color and to volcanic geographic nature of Painan, West Sumatra, where it occurs

Rasbora vulgaris Duncker 1904    common or ordinary, allusion not explained, perhaps referring to similarity with R. elegans and R. buchanani (= rasbora), and/or to ordinary (i.e., unspectacular) coloration

Rasbora wilpita Kottelat & Pethiyagoda 1991    referring to the Wilpita estate, which borders Welihena Forest Preserve, Parusella, Sri Lanka, type locality

Rasboroides Brittan 1954    oides, having the form of: Rasbora, from which it differs in having an extra anal fin ray

Rasboroides nigromarginata (Meinken 1957)    nigro-, black; marginata, bordered, referring to black margins on scales and/or blackish pectoral-, pelvic- and anal-fins margins (except in females, which lack the black dorsal and anal-fin margins)

Rasboroides pallidus (Deraniyagala 1958)    pale, referring to “Pale orange upper rim of orbit”

Rasboroides rohani Batuwita, de Silva & Edirisinghe 2013    in honor of Rohan Pethiyagoda, Founder of the Wildlife Heritage Trust of Sri Lanka, for his special commitment to the ichthyofauna of Sri Lanka and India and his support of biodiversity research and conservation in Sri Lanka

Rasboroides vaterifloris (Deraniyagala 1930)    vater, from Vateria acuminata, a tree; floris, blossom, referring to its bright orange flower, which resembles this minnow’s orange dorsal and caudal fins [as noted in Pethiyagoda’s Freshwater Fishes of Sri Lanka (1991), the flower of V. acuminata is cream or white, never bright orange; Deraniyagala may have confused V. acuminata (locally called hal) with sal, the cannonball tree (Couroupita guianensis), which has an orange flower]

Rasbosoma Liao, Kullander & Fang 2010    soma, body, referring to overall similarity to Rasbora, the genus from which it was split

Rasbosoma spilocerca (Rainboth & Kottelat 1987)    spilos, spot; cercus, tail, referring to large spot on caudal fin

Rastrineobola Fowler 1936    a Neobola with rastrum, rake or raker, referring to long, lanceolate gill rakers

Rastrineobola argentea (Pellegrin 1904)    silvery, referring to silvery coloration on flanks and sides of head

Salmostoma Swainson 1839    salmo, salmon; stoma, mouth, allusion not evident, perhaps referring to wide, salmon-like mouth

Salmostoma acinaces (Valenciennes 1844)    scimitar, presumably referring to sabre-like shape of body

Salmostoma bacaila (Hamilton 1822)    local Bengali vernacular for this species

Salmostoma balookee (Sykes 1839)    Marathi vernacular for this species in India, which, as Sykes explained in 1841, he adopted “so that naturalists who travel the country can always obtain” the species

Salmostoma belachi Jayaraj, Krishna Rao, Ravichandra Reddy, Shakuntala & Devaraj 1999    vernacular name for this species, from Kamada (India) word for blanched, referring to coloration (bright silver over dorsal profile, white below lateral line)

Salmostoma boopis (Day 1874)    bo, ox; ops, eye, probably referring to large eyes, which are ½ length of head

Salmostoma horai (Silas 1951)    in honor of ichthyologist Sunder Lal Hora (1896-1955), Director, Zoological Survey of India

Salmostoma novacula (Valenciennes 1840)    Latin for sharp knife or razor, referring to knife-like shape

Salmostoma orissaense Bănărescu 1968    from Orissa Province, India, type locality

Salmostoma punjabense (Day 1872)    from Punjab, Pakistan (type locality), and/or to Punjab region of India and Pakistan, where it is endemic

Salmostoma phulo (Hamilton 1822)    derived from Phul chela, local Bengali name for this species

Salmostoma sardinella (Valenciennes 1844)    diminutive of Sardina, a sardine, which it resembles

Salmostoma sladoni (Day 1870)    patronym not identified, perhaps in honor of Col. Edward Sladen (1827-1890, note different spelling), British Burma Commission 1856-1886 (type was collected in Myanmar)

Salmostoma untrahi (Day 1869)    local Oriya (also spelled Ooriah) name for this species in the Indian state of Orissa

Securicula Günther 1868    ax or hatchet, referring to knife- or blade-like shape of body

Securicula gora (Hamilton 1822)    latinization of Ghora, from Ghora Chela, local Bengali name for this species

Sundadanio Kottelat & Witte 1999    Sunda, large islands of western Indonesia (Borneo and Sumatra, where it occurs); danio, a danionine cyprinid

Sundadanio atomus Conway, Kottelat & Tan 2011    atom (i.e., an indivisible particle), referring to small size (up to 15.7 mm SL)

Sundadanio axelrodi (Brittan 1976)    in honor of pet-book publisher Herbert R. Axelrod (b. 1927), who discovered this species in the tanks of a Singapore aquarium fish exporter, for the “introduction of many new species into the aquarium-fish trade, a substantial number of which have proved to be new to science”

Sundadanio echinus Conway, Kottelat & Tan 2011    hedgehog, referring to large, spiny turbercles on lower jaw of all congeners but first discovered on this species

Sundadanio gargula Conway, Kottelat & Tan 2011    gargoyle, referring to somewhat grotesque of head and throat of tuberculate males

Sundadanio goblinus Conway, Kottelat & Tan 2011    goblin, referring to small size (characteristic of genus) and somewhat “gnarled” appearance

Sundadanio margarition Conway, Kottelat & Tan 2011    small jewel, referring to shimmering live coloration of all members of genus

Sundadanio retiarius Conway, Kottelat & Tan 2011    Roman gladiator armed with a piece of netting and a trident, referring to reticulated pattern along dorsal surface

Sundadanio rubellus Conway, Kottelat & Tan 2011    reddish, referring to live coloration of fins in males

Thryssocypris Roberts & Kottelat 1984    thrissos, herring or anchovy, referring to anchovylike appearance; cypris, a small carp, a common suffix for cyprinid genera

Thryssocypris ornithostoma Kottelat 1991    ornithos, bird; stoma, mouth, referring to beak-like snout

Thryssocypris smaragdinus Roberts & Kottelat 1984    emerald green, referring to color of upper half of head and body in life

Thryssocypris tonlesapensis Roberts & Kottelat 1984    ensis, suffix denoting place: Tonle Sap, large permanent backwater of the lower Mekong, into which the two known localities (Prek Tamen in Cambodia, and Prek Tasom in Viêt Nam) flow

Thryssocypris wongrati Grudpan & Grudpan 2012    in honor of Dr. Prachit Wongrat, the authors’ first teacher in ichthyology

Trigonopoma Liao, Kullander & Fang 2010    trigonos, triangle; poma, lid, referring to triangular shape of opercle

Trigonopoma gracile (Kottelat 1991)    slender or thin, presumably referring to caudal peduncle slender than all other Rasbora (genus in which it was described)

Trigonopoma pauciperforatum (Weber & de Beaufort 1916)    pauci-, few, referring to how lateral line consists of only five perforated scales

Trigonostigma Kottelat & Witte 1999    trigonon, triangle; stigma, mark or spot, referring to black triangular blotch on side

Trigonostigma espei (Meinken 1967)    in honor or ornamental fish importer-exporter Heinrich Espe, who sent specimens to Meinken to investigate whether they were a distinct species or a color morph of T. heteromorpha

Trigonostigma hengeli (Meinken 1956)    in honor of Dutch ornamental fish importer-exporter J. van Hengel, who sent specimens to Meinken for identification

Trigonostigma heteromorpha (Duncker 1904)    heteros, different or special; morpha, shape, presumably referring to higher and deeper shape compared to more streamlined shape of Rasbora (in which species had originally been placed)

Trigonostigma somphongsi (Meinken 1958)    in honor of the Somphongs Aquarium Company, Bangkok, “which has supplied the German aquarium fish hobby with many beautiful fish novelties and will, it is hoped, provide even more” (translation)